Rolling Coastal Blacking Out or Something Like That

April 2, 2017 at 6:30 pm | Posted in Australia, Music, Seattle, Shows | 4 Comments
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rbcf

One thing about Melbourne, Australia’s Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever is that I can never seem to get their name right. It doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, you know. How many bands have four word names these days? People are lucky enough to be able to remember two word band names. It seems that their US label Sub Pop realizes this, shortening the band’s name for their US debut to Rolling Blackouts C.F. I don’t know if this is better though. It isn’t a whole lot easier to remember, and it gives the impression that there is already a band named Coastal Blackouts and these Blackouts are from some country with the initials C.F.

Another thing about Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever is that they jangle. You hear the likely suspects (Bats, Clean, & Feelies) in their sound, but their jangle comes from a more classic rock corner of the universe. Their sound can best be described by the Close Lobsters‘ cover of Neil Young‘s Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black). They sound like they’ve done their time on the bar circuit, and taken their lumps winning over hard drinking, blue collar fellows in dungarees.

One more thing about Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, they’re show this past Tuesday at Barboza here in Seattle was a lot of fun. The five piece band featured three guitarists and singers, but their secret weapon, which all great bands will attest to, was their rhythm section. Every song was anchored by some great bass riffs which was really apparent live. That firm mooring allowed the guitarists to really go into their hyper-manic-riff mode trading licks and often vocal spots. This band seems to be very well oiled machine.

One final thing about Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, they do a mighty fine cover of the Orange Juice classic Blueboy!

Seattle’s designated openers for all Australian jangly type bands, Zebra Hunt did just that. On this night I found out:

    • In Australia, zebra is pronounced with a short ‘e’.
    • Zebra Hunt’s second LP is coming out May 19.
    • The band now seems to be a permanent four piece.
    • They have got a brand new set of songs that rivals the ones the made me fan in the first place.
    • They just keep getting better!
    • They might actually be Australian judging from their ace cover of the Go-Betweens‘ Was There Anything I Could Do?

Belated List of 2016 Seattle LP’s

January 6, 2017 at 8:45 pm | Posted in Albums, Lists, Music, Seattle | Leave a comment
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Is it too late for a list of my favorite hometown albums from last year? Probably, so go ahead and send a letter to the editor if you are feeling list fatigue. Otherwise continue reading and I promise this is the last one till next year.

erikblood
1. Erik Blood – Lost In Slow Motion (Home Skillet)
Blood was involved in a lot of records this year, including recording two others on this list (Tacocat & Hotels). For his third album Erik Blood is still a solo act, but it’s mostly in name alone. Irene Barber provides additional guitar and singing throughout while it is book-ended by guest vocal appearances from Ismael Butler and OCnotes. He transcends any shoegaze pigeonhole he may have had and broadens his horizons to wide screen cinematic pop.

exquisites
2. The Exquisits – Home (Asian Man)
The Exquisits have a sweaty punk sound that brings to mind Van Morrisson, the Hold Steady and Buffalo Tom. I also love the way they deftly incorporate horns into their powerful pop making it even more exciting.

tacocat
3. Tacocat – Lost Time (Hardly Art)
Album number three finds Tacocat with no shortage of inspiration, Seattle, working on the weekend, X-Files and dealing with idiots on the internet. It is immediate and bright and speaks to you whether you are 14 or 40.

versing
4. Versing – Nude Descending (Youth Riot)
Reason number 99 for why I don’t own a record label: When I first saw Versing they played with the then unsigned So Pitted. A few months later So Pitted signed to Sub Pop and released record. Versing put their dissonant Pavement meets Swell Maps record out about a year later on the tiny Tacoma label Youth Riot.

vats
5. Vats – Green Glass Room (End of Time)
On the radio station that plays in my head, any song from this record would be played in a set that included Gang of Four, Lithics, A Frames and the Pheromoans. With its bony elbows, Green Glass Room  makes its own space in the dissonant,/angular/punk  room.

sloucher
6. Sloucher – Certainty (Swoon)
Sloucher’s Heatmiser meets Sebadoh takes you back to the 90’s heyday of Seattle rock history.

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7. Crater – Talk To Me So I Can Fall Asleep (Help Yourself)
This electronic duo due make dark and moody songs that are just light and breezy enough to dance too.

hotels
8. Hotels – Night Showers (Self-released)
Hotels have been knocking around Seattle for years, and have released a number of albums and singles but none as good as their latest. Enhancing their atmospheric guitar based songs with luscious doses of horns and strings makes Night Showers really pop!

lisaprank
9. Lisa Prank – Adult Teen (Father/Daughter)
Colorado transplant Lisa Prank writes bedroom punk rock similar to Colleen Green, like if the Ramones were in your bedroom and preferred a drum machine.

gazebos
10. Gazebos – Die Alone (Hardly Art)
Recorded by former Fastbacks guitarist Kurt Bloch and fronted by a couple Seattle indierock linchpins – T.V. Coahran who runs Gorgonzola  Records and Shannon Perry formerly of Butts and Katharine Hepburn’s Voice. This record  feels like it was made by a band of roving minstrels who found some wagons full of amplifiers. It’s loud with a slightly unhinged feel that keeps you on your toes .

Catching Chook Race While They’re Around the USA

October 16, 2016 at 2:14 pm | Posted in Australia, Jangle, Music, Seattle, Shows | Leave a comment
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chookrace

Taking on America with an extensive 25 date tour is ambitious for any band, but when you’re Chook Race, a little known three piece jangle pop band from Melbourne, Australia it’s downright impressive (and maybe a little insane). The band made its way into Seattle Wednesday night to play the Victory Lounge, a bar with no stage in East Lake. This is one band I thought I would never see in Seattle, but after self-releasing their first album, Chicago label Trouble in Mind signed them making their second LP widely available in the United States as well as this tour a reality.

Singer and guitarist Matthew Liveriadis has a slight monotone delivery, but drummer Carolyn Hawkins provides a beautiful juxtaposition with her backing harmonies. The trio played an energized and jangly set inspired by the Bats and Close Lobsters mixing soon to be jangle pop classics from their first LP with ones of a slightly more classic pop sound from their new second album Around the House. In their short existence the band already have a stash of A-list songs and they didn’t leave any of them out including jangly diamonds like Dentist, Time, Sometimes and Hard to Clean and Older. The band’s tight sound and laid back attitude easily won over the likely already won over folks in attendance and made us all appreciate the long trip they had made to get here.

zebrahunt

Like minded Seattlites Zebra Hunt opened for Chook Race with a set that consisted almost entirely of new songs (Half Right was the only old one). Apparently the new album is nearly ready and based on this evidence I would agree. One song really stood out with its Feelies-like crazy rhythm, even slowing down and then rebuilding itself into something quite raucous. Zebra Hunt has still got it!

An Interview With Math & Physics Club

June 26, 2016 at 8:30 pm | Posted in indiepop, Music, Seattle | Leave a comment
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Math & Physics Club

Scotland has Belle & Sebastian, Australia has the Lucksmiths and the Pacific Northwest has Math & Physics Club. The Puget Sound darlings share a common aesthetic with the former and a record label with the latter. While they never got out and toured the world to the extent of their colleagues, they’ve been releasing quality records for more than a decade. The Olympia by way of Seattle band (or vice versa) began as a trio, expanded to a quintet and then shrunk back down to a trio and now appear to have settled on being a quartet all the while releasing superbly crafted beautifully melancholy records. The band have just released a compilation that collects their first three EPs and some sundry B-sides. For those of us familiar with the band it’s a great reminder of how good those early songs were and for those not yet acquainted it serves as a great introductory and overview of one of indiepop’s well kept secrets.

Having lived in the PNW for about as long as Math & Physics Club has been around I feel like their records have been like soundtrack to my life up here. I’ve also had the pleasure of seeing them play live many times. After their recent in-store performance at Sonic Boom Records in Ballard I asked them if they wouldn’t mind answering a few questions for this blog. They kindly agreed. I hope you enjoy their insightful answers to my pedestrian questions, and if you happen to be in Seattle this summer the band will play a rare show at the Vera Project on August 8th. Also, be sure to pick up the new compilation In This Together from Matinée Recordings and Fika Recordings.

Do you recognize the Seattle of today compared to the one of 2005 when you released your first EP Weekends Away?

Ethan: It’s different, but we’re different too.  You can definitely follow the threads from the past into the present, but I guess recently it’s gotten to be a heavier weave.

Charles: I recently visited Bellingham where I went to college, and I couldn’t remember the last time I was there. It was familiar in that I could still find my way around, and a few of the old shops were still there, but a lot was new and I felt out of place even though I’d lived there for 6 years of my life. Seattle is a bit like that for me now. We’ve taken a lot of time between albums and shows in recent years, and each time we come up for air it feels like I barely recognize the musical landscape.

What has it been like being a band that could be described as twee in a city known for lumberjacks and grunge? Who were some of the bands that you identified with back then?

Ethan: Well, we liked the Posies, the Dharma Bums, Beat Happening, Young Fresh Fellows, Lois, Tullycraft, the Fastbacks, and in a way I think we’ve always seen ourselves as an extension of that part of the local scene, rather than the grunge scene. More Popllama or K than Subpop, if that means anything.  Although I guess we don’t sound like any of those bands, they’re part of our culture.

James:  I’m really thankful we got the chance to see all those bands growing up.  I think we probably learned a lot about the aesthetics of being in a band from watching people like Calvin Johnson or Jeremy Wilson from the Dharma Bums.  There wasn’t much separation between the audience and the musicians.  There was very few rock star personalities.  One minute you’d be standing next to someone watching the show and the next minute they’d be up on stage playing.

Charles: I love how James described it there. I think more than anything we were exposed to bands that respected each other and their audience, and that’s what rubbed off in how we’ve approached being in a band.

Do you think that sounding so different from the what people expected a band from Seattle (or Olympia) to sound like helped you to get recognized in the beginning?

Ethan: I’m not sure if it helped or hurt.  We like a lot of the same bands other people like, and that comes out in the music.

Charles:  I think it’s fair to say it helped us in the beginning. We probably didn’t sound like a lot of the other demos that landed on desks at KEXP, for example. Sometimes getting people’s attention is half the battle.

The story is that you sent a demo tape to Jimmy at Matinee and quickly became the first American band on the label. What songs were on the demo and why do you think you’re the only band on that American record label? Do you have to speak with an accent when you talk to your label?

Ethan: Our first EP is basically identical to the demo, except we included Love Again on the EP instead of Nothing Really Happened.  The demo version of Nothing Really Happened is on the new compilation.  I think the story is, Mark Monnone from the Lucksmiths was staying with Jimmy when our demo arrived in the mail, and Mark talked him into giving us a chance.

James:  I think that actually is a true story.  We should ask Mark and Jimmy to tell us what happened that fabled night.  Right when we were joining Matinee another American band called the Fairways was sort of calling it a day.  I always loved their music and wished we’d had the chance to get to know them and play a few shows together.

Charles: I think some of that is Mark’s cheeky version of the story, but no doubt he was there when Jimmy got the demo. Whatever the real story, it couldn’t have worked out more perfectly for us. As for why we’re still the only American band on the label, you’d have to ask Jimmy, but if you look around the States there really aren’t a lot of bands doing a similar style of pop, which fits pretty neatly into Matinee’s aesthetic.

How were the first two EPs recorded, were they done by yourselves or did you go into a studio for them?

Ethan: They were mostly recorded at Silvermaple Studio, which is what we called James’ basement, and it consisted of an old computer with CoolEdit, a Mackie PA for preamps and reverb, and a couple of SM57s. The drums for the second EP were recorded in a friend’s basement because he could record more than two mics at a time! Some bits were recorded at Charles’ house, too.  We mixed the first EP ourselves, and I think we mixed the second EP too, but our mix was so bad that the mastering engineer told us to redo it.  Kevin had all the files on his laptop, but he was leaving for several weeks, so he remixed the whole EP from scratch in a day or two!  I actually really like the sound of the early EPs.

James:  There really is nothing more terrifying than having Barry Corliss listen to your mix and then point to the door and say come back for mastering when you have it fixed.  We really had no idea what we were doing when it came to writing and recording music which was part of the fun.  Not knowing how to do something meant there weren’t really any rules.

Charles: Though not following any rules also meant you got sent home to redo it by Barry! My favorite bit of nostalgia about recording those early EPs is that Kevin played the bass drum on Sixteen and Pretty with a spoon because he’d forgotten some piece of drum equipment that day. In all honesty, I used to feel sheepish about the lo-fi sound on the early recordings, but after having worked in a bunch of studios since then, I appreciate that we were somehow able to capture a feeling that’s not easy to replicate.

MAPC was originally five members, but Kevin Emerson (though Kevin still plays drums in the band) and Saundrah Humphrey left after the first album. Besides the obvious we’re now a three piece, how did the band change when they left?

Ethan: Mostly it streamlined our decision making. We’ve always made all our decisions together, so now there are only three people in all the email threads.  Usually we figure out the details, and then see if Kevin’s available.  And he almost always is. We’ve been playing together for so long, Kevin just knows what to play almost automatically.  Before we went into the studio to record California, I think we only rehearsed twice!

James:  I’m not entirely sure Kevin isn’t back to being a full time member of MAPC these days.  We should ask him sometime!

Charles: At the time Kevin left, I don’t think we quite realized how much the band is really defined by the four of us. We’ve played with other drummers who are our friends and fine musicians, but there’s something about the four of us together that just feels like magic, if you’ll pardon the metaphysics. Luckily we’ve found a way to keep him close. And Saundrah was such a vital part of our early sound that we couldn’t help but change, and I think you can hear the difference in our sound after she left in 2007.

Not many bands stay together for ten plus years. How do you account for your longevity?

Ethan: Well, we’re friends.  Some people have poker nights, or they get together to watch football games or something, but we have the band.  And because we’re friends, we all know that family comes first, and so we just get together when we can.  It’s not always easy, but when we get together, everything just falls into place.  It sounds like us, and that’s really satisfying.

James:  So there’s laughing and then there’s can’t catch your breath sort of laughing.  I’ve probably laughed the hardest over the last ten years hanging out doing stuff with this band.  We have a ton of fun when we get together and the music just flows easily for some magical reason.

Charles: I love you guys.

More bands should play in museums. I recently saw the Intelligence play the Frye and it reminded me of seeing you play SAM. I think you even covered  the Stone Roses & Razorcuts at that performance. What were some of your more memorable shows in Seattle and elsewhere?

Ethan: We actually got to play our Razorcuts cover with Gregory Webster once!  He sang A Is for Alphabet with us at San Francisco Popfest, but sadly the only evidence is a photograph of the top of Gregory’s head!

James:  Museums, libraries, record stores, etc. are absolutely some of the coolest places we’ve had a chance to play.  Our show at the Seattle Art Museum is probably one of my all time favorite live experiences along with the time we played at the same local public library Charles and I used to go to in Olympia when we were kids.

Charles: I love playing in alternative venues. I wish Seattle had more affordable makeshift music spaces. I’m still hoping to find a boat we can play on! Playing at Bumbershoot in the Sky Church in 2005 is one of my favorites. I couldn’t believe how packed it was, and we were playing on this huge stage and it was weird and wonderful.

I know Charles has been playing in Unlikely Friends with Dave from BOAT, but you included a brand new song (Coastal California, 1985) on the new compilation. So what does the future have in store for MAPC?

Ethan: We recorded another song at the same time as Coastal California, and we’re holding onto that for the future. We have a plan to record some new demos.  We’re working up plans for a little tour in the Autumn but I think that’s still a secret.  Also, Kevin and I have a side project called Northern Allies, which is more of a new wave postpunk sort of band.  But Math and Physics Club seems to turn up opportunities for fun and adventure, which is all anyone can ask for, and it manages to stay alive somehow.  I’m so thankful it does.

James:  We don’t really have a roadmap drawn for MAPC.  We’re just sort of letting it evolve organically and we’ll see where that takes us next.

Charles: Nothing so far has gone according to any plan we could have dreamed up. As long as it continues to be fun, we’ll keep doing it.

Savak

June 17, 2016 at 8:10 am | Posted in DC, Music, Punks, Seattle | Leave a comment
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savak

Taking after Gang of Four, Joy Division, Dead Kennedys and more recently Viet Cong, Savak stir up the pot right from the get go by naming themselves for the Iranian secret police under the Shah of Iran. They probably won’t be invited to play at Oberlin College in Ohio, but I doubt they care. Featuring members of Obits, Nation of Ulysses, the Cops, Holy Fuck, Edsel, et al, these punk rock veterans know what they’re doing and will not be dissuaded or deterred.

Former Obits guitarist and Edsel front guy Sohrab Habibion and former Cops front guy, Mt Fuji records proprietor and Seattleite Michael Jaworski share vocal duties throughout. Their styles mesh well and lend themselves well to the earnest and tempestuous songs. You can hear the old DC punk influence of the Dischord sect mixed in with some good old fashioned That Petrol Emotion acerbic energy on Alive In Shadows, Drop the Pieces, Call It a Night and Early Western Traders. Traders also features some great skronky saxophone that makes it an easy highlight of the record. Elsewhere you can hear some REM influence on Reaction and Burned by a Fever which should keep listeners with fainter hearts engaged.  Best of Luck In Future Endeavors is a solid record with something on it for old punks, new punks and punks in training.

You can stream and buy the download at Savak’s bandcamp page, or buy the vinyl and CD version from the record label Comedy Minus One.

Erik Blood Lost In Slow Motion

May 3, 2016 at 10:21 am | Posted in Music, Seattle | Leave a comment
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Erik Blood at the High Dive, Seattle | 30 April 2016

Erik Blood at the High Dive, Seattle

Way back in 2008 two notable Seattle bands broke up. After four albums the Turn-Ons who were a top notch shoegaze band well ahead of the shoegaze revival released their final album Curse. The other band, the Hungry Pines released their only album that same year. It had some great guitar drenched songs and tons of potential. Erik Blood was a member of the Turn-Ons and he went on to release the under-appreciated and under-heard the Way We Live the following year. Irene Barber of Hungry Pines formed a new band XVII Eyes. Then in 2013 they both sang on Vox Mod‘s SYN-ÆSTHETIC and the following year Barber again contributed vocals to follow up The Great Oscillator. The results were astounding as you can hear on the track Flight of Fancy.

Erik Blood’s new album Lost In Slow Motion picks up where Flight of Fancy left off. It is an Erik Blood album, but Barber is so woven into the grooves of this album they could call themselves a duo. With Barber in the fold Blood has taken the shoegaze of his earlier records and added even more ethereal elements that are reminiscent of 1980’s 4AD to create his most fully realized album yet. Similar to one of those French producer geniuses like Bertrand Brugalat or Hector Zazou, Blood lets his collaborators take the spotlight. Ishmael Butler of Shabazz Palaces and OCnotes provide vocals on a track each and Barber is featured throughout.

Saturday night at the High Dive in Fremont was the record release show for Lost In Slow Motion. On the album cover Blood is dressed in a black coat, hat and mask and Barber has the top half of her face painted red and the bottom white. Taking wardrobe inspiration from V for Vendetta, Seattle’s Ohnonos and Reykjavik’s Bjork, the duo emerged onto the stage dressed identically to the album cover.  It was a stunning entrance as they were joined by OCNotes who sings the album closer and highlight Out This Way. Blood painted a Prince symbol on the projection screen at the back of the stage and then played the entire record with the exception of the Butler track. It was choreographed with a laptop as their backing band, but it didn’t take a way from the performance. Though Barber and Blood were eye catching and even their dance moves were tight, it was the music that was the most gripping. The guazy bed of strings and electronic sounds provided lush support for their guitars. The performance was more evidence of the Blood’s newfound well of ideas and felt like a natural extension of both the music and art of the brilliant Lost In Slow Motion album.

Listen to and buy the download version from Erik Blood’s Bandcamp page, or order the vinyl version from Home Skillet Records.

Very Contemporary: Field Music at the Crocodile

April 5, 2016 at 8:24 pm | Posted in Crocodile, Music, Seattle | Leave a comment
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Field Music at the Crocodile, Seattle | 29 March 2016

FieldMusic

After six albums Sunderland, England’s Field Music finally made their Seattle debut Tuesday night at the Crocodile (though David Brewis played the Nectar Lounge back in 2008 with his School of Language). The band are often compared to XTC and Steely Dan, and could be accused of being a musician’s band. Meaning that you need to be a musician to appreciate them, and to be honest as I looked around the room that night it looked like I might be a minor and younger music nerd compared with many in the crowd. So this show was a long time coming for many Field Music fans, but well worth the wait

The Brewis brothers are supporting their latest and possibly best album yet Commontime which contains a new lightness of being that gives a new dimension to the band. They sound like they’re having more fun and of course there’s the added funk element. How much funk you ask, well Prince is a fan and the brothers have admitted to looking to both Beyoncé and Hall and Oats for inspiration. That was evident right from the start as the band blasted into the Noisy Days Are Over with its looping base. It was obvious that Field Music were here to have fun. It featured Peter on guitar and vocals and his brother David on drums. They would take turns on guitar and drums throughout the night. I kept changing my mind about which was the better drummer and which the better guitarist. Both of them seemed to in a jovial mood  with lots of banter between songs and encouraging of hecklers. At one point they were invited to karaoke after the show, but declined saying they only did Michael Jackson BAD at karaoke.

Other highlights in the set included Disappointed and It’s a Good Thing from Commontime, Let’s Write a Book from Measure, If Only The Moon Were Up from their debut, and A House Is Not a Home from Tones of Town. It was a perfect combination of old and new in front of a truly appreciative audience. One of the best shows of the year to accompany one of its best albums.

The Quietus has an insightful interview with the Brewis brothers.

The setlist from the show:

The Noisy Days Are Over
I’m Glad
Disappointed
Let’s Write A Book
Don’t You Want To Know What’s Wrong?
A House Is Not A Home
It’s A Good Thing
Who’ll Pay the Bills?
Them That Do Nothing
Effortlessly
If Only The Moon Were Up
How Many More Times?
Just Like Everyone Else
Stay Awake
(I Keep Thinking About) A New Thing
—–
Give It Lose It Take It

 

 

Verse Chorus Versing

February 24, 2016 at 10:04 pm | Posted in Music, Seattle | Leave a comment
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versing

Versing blasted their way into my life early last summer at the Sunset in Ballard. Their Wire meets Pavement, meets Number One Cup meets Seam meets Swell Maps elixir is a combination often tried but rarely done well enough to actually contribute to the plot line. Right out of the gate Versing have written a new chapter to the story. Protagonists in their story include jagged guitars rumbling bass and choruses that have you hoping for a quick sequel. Nude Descending is their seven song debut EP that blazes a trail through the boredom inducing clutter of today’s new bands who just merely play music.

Download the EP at Versing’s Bandcamp or get the vinyl from Youth Riot Records.

Some Good Albums from Seattle This Year

December 23, 2015 at 7:52 pm | Posted in Albums, Lists, Music, Seattle | 1 Comment
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The moss has grown another layer over the past year here in the upper left corner of the U.S. and my stack of records from this Pacific Northwest outpost has grown as well. Luckily I have a cool dry place to store them. Here are my favorite records from Seattle for 2015, center justified for your reading comfort.

zebrahunt

Zebra Hunt – City Sighs (Tenorio Cotobade)
Buy | Listen

My favorite album of the year from Seattle or anywhere. If you’ve been reading along this year you probably could have easily guessed that.

theesatisfaction
TheeSatisfaction – Earthee (Sub Pop)
Buy | Listen

Unclassifiable soul, hip hop, space age record that is part throwback, part social commentary and part bravely looking into the dark distant future.

childbirth
Childbirth – Women’s Rights (Suicide Squeeze)
Buy | Listen

The best feminist punk rock manifesto with a since of humor since forever.

unlikelyfriends
Unlikely Friends – Solid Gold Cowboys (Jigsaw)
Buy | Listen

With the rise of Unlikely Friends, fans of Boat and Math and Physics Club can’t be too sad that neither of those bands released a record this year. I wasn’t.

telekinesis
Telekinesis – Ad Infinitum (Merge)
Buy | Listen

Michael Lerner eschewed his guitars and started collecting vintage synths to create a record inspired by OMD, Postal Service and Blue Nile.

laluz
La Luz – Weirdo Shrine (Hardly Art)
Buy | Listen

Enlisting Ty Segall to record their sophomore record La Luz continue to shoot the curl with another great set of surf rock.

wimps
Wimps – Suitcase (Kill Rock Stars)
Buy | Listen

Wimps dial up another batch of killer slacker punk rock anthems (if there is such a thing). Their sophomore LP Suitcase sees them getting higher marks in all categories which, given their M.O. is probably exactly the opposite of what they were going for.

gracelove
Grace Love and the True Loves – Grace Love and the True Loves (Self-Released)
Buy | Listen

The great soul revival of 2015 even reached such remote outposts as Seattle and Grace Love and the True Loves debut album was one of the best soul records of the year from any city.

DetectiveAgency
Detective Agency – Now (Discos de Kirlian)
Buy | Listen

I’m not sure if Detective Agency would appreciate being called indiepop, but I call ’em like I see ’em and this is some very fine indiepop!

car seat headrest
Car Seat Headrest –  Teens of Style (Matador)
Buy | Listen

The career of Will Toledo of Car Seat Headrest reminds me of Steven Jones of Babybird. Make a bunch of songs in your bedroom and release them and then find a band to re-record the best ones and voila, instant good record rooted in lo-fi but with some new bright corners.

ponytime

Ponytime – Rumours 2: The Rumours Are True (S-S)
Buy | Listen

Apparently Fleetwood Mac has permeated the garage rock scene of Seattle. I doubt there are any complicated love quadrangles in this band since they’re a duo. They’re more focused on just delivering a bunch of killer jams.
chastitybelt

Chastity Belt – Time To Go Home (Hardly Art)
Buy | Listen

Chastity Belt got serious on album  album number two. Their first LP No Regerts was middle school lo-brow humor compared to Time To Go Home’s more mature and measured sound that is a unique combination of drone and some of that heavier rock from the 90’s for which Seattle is well known.

Wildhoney Make the Hardcore Kids Swoon

December 2, 2015 at 7:55 pm | Posted in Music, Neptune Theatre, Seattle | Leave a comment
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Wildhoney at the Neptune Theatre, Seattle | 17 November 2015

wildhoney

I always wonder if a band that makes great records can deliver them live, especially today in today’s world full of bands making albums in their bedroom on their laptop. Wildhoney proved that they are the real deal opening for a couple hard core bands La Dispute and Envy at the Neptune Theatre in Seattle’s University District. The audience was predominately young hardcore fans, but the Baltimore band seemed to win them over with their infectious blend of ethereal noisepop and shoegaze.

Singer Lauren Shusterich’s voice easily danced over the tremolo laden wall of guitars. Mid-set a girl behind me yelled out to the band “You’re sooo cute!” I think they may have momentarily blushed, but then they tore into another one of their seemingly endless supply of killer songs. The night before OG shoegazers Ride had played the same stage. I didn’t go and after seeing Wildhoney I don’t think I missed anything.

Don’t miss their latest EP Your Face Sideways (recorded by Gary Olson of the Ladybug Transistor) which evokes some serious Velocity Girl vibes.

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