It’s Not Easy Being Green

peaness
When you tell someone that you’re really into Peaness, it’s all about the accent. Otherwise you could be easily misunderstood. UK indiepop trio Peaness have been bubbling up with a self-released cassette called No Fun and then an internet single Oh George that is so undeniable that it could have you lining up to buy it if it existed in some form where you actually had to line up to buy it.

Take heart patient pop fans, the band now have a 7-inch single out now on Vancouver, Canada’s Kingfisher Bluez. If you are a fan of Standard Fare/Mammoth Penguins or Allo Darlin’ then this record will be one you want to add to your collection. Even if the single contains two songs that were on the cassette and leaves off their best song to date (Oh George), you the erudite pop fan won’t sweat the details because you will want to own one of the best singles of the year and be ready for what these ladies have in store next.

Massive Music News Update

I have been amassing a ton information that has come to the tipping point where I have to let it out.  Some of this may have been tweeted, but who remembers anything they read on Twitter? You possibly have heard half of it, but then maybe you haven’t. Here’s the mid-summer digest of the finest kiss music news.

Allo Darlin’ set to release new single

Last week Allo Darlin’ announced the release of a brand new single due in August. You can hear it and pre-order it over at their bandcamp. It’s a picture disc and contains one song about former Hefner frontman Darren Hayman and one song about the Wu Tang Clan which is a cover of another Hayman band the French. How’s that for confusing?

Art Museums Break Up

After a short but fruitful run San Francisco’s Art Museums have said their splitting up. According to their Facebook page, they just couldn’t handle it anymore. They had recently released two 7 inch singles one on Slumberland and another on Yakamashi. I don’t know about you, but I could have handled a few more records from them. So long Art Museums. See you in the funny papers.

mp3: Art Museums – Dancing With a Hole In Your Heart (from the Slumberland single)

Portland band Blouse played the Crocodile

I stopped by the Crocodile the other night to see Blouse. So far the Portland new wavers have released singles on Captured Tracks and Sub Pop with an album due this fall on CT. Their singer was totally going for the 80’s vibe with her poofy feathered hair and white pleated slacks. Their short set (25 minutes) much better than their fashion sense, playing light airy sounds accented with muscular Cure-like bass lines.


Chicago band has a Brain Idea, Sound Like the Clean, Name Their EP after CCR

I’m kind of possessed this week by the new EP from Brain Idea on Mexican Summer. It’s part Clean, part Kraut, of course the Clean always have had a Kraut element to their sound so maybe it’s all Clean. Whatever, it’s good. I just ordered their first album that came out on Permanent last year.

mp3: Brain Idea – Oh I’m Free (Earn Your Card) (Out now on Mexican Summer)

It Was Only a Matter of Time: Flexis Are Back


Castle Face the San Francisco label part-run by Thee Oh Sees’ John Dwyer have just unleashed a book of flexis. Bare Wires, Blasted Canyons, Thee Ohs Sees, The Fresh & Onlys and Ty Segall &  Mikal Cronin each contribute a song spread across Five 7 inch flexis discs. It comes packaged in a ringed notebook and it ain’t cheap at $30. I thought flexies were supposed to be cheap. They use to come stapled inside of magazines and sounded like crap on your turntable.  I’m assuming the quality of these is slightly better.

mp3: Bare Wires – Wanna Fight (You can order one from Midheaven. Mp3 swiped from RSTB)

Detroit Deadbeat Beat

Another band on Twitter hips me to another new cool band. Seattle’s TacocaT tweeted the other night how Detroit’s Deadbeat Beat are their new favorite band. A couple clicks later, they’re mine too.

Felt: Gone But Not Yet Forgotten

Felt have been defunct for 22 years now, but way down in the depths of the internet they never went away. A couple years ago the San Francisco band Girls interviewed Lawrence for Magicrpm and just recently the Charlatans‘ Tim Burgess was interviewed over at The Quietus about them. I didn’t know that Burgess was such a superfan. He drops a few debatable nuggets like the idea that She Lives By The Castle was written about St. Etienne‘s Sarah Cracknell. If you are a Felt superfan you probably already know about the book written by JC Brouchard called Felt : Ballad of the Fan.

Fine Arts Showcase’s Gustaf Kjellvander Dies


Sad news from Sweden a few weeks ago, when Gustaf Kjellvander died unexpectedly in his sleep. He was only 31 years old. Kjellvander lived in Seattle until he was 15 when his family moved back to Sweden. He made some great albums as the Fine Arts Showcase. My two favorites were Radiola and his Rough Bunnies covers album Sings Rough Bunnies.

Green Pajamas Go To Green Pajama Country

Seattle’s Green Pajamas are back with album number…I lost count. No matter, this time they claim to have gone country. The first song from the record, Pass Me Another Whiskey doesn’t sound particularly country. It just sounds good.

Hausu Continue the Northwest’s Flirtation With British New Wave

Led by former Seattleite and underage organizer Ben Funkhouser and his Edwyn Collins-esque croon, Portland band Hausu‘s ringing guitars and smart sound bring to mind Collin’s former band. They also claim to be influenced by Bruce Springsteen, but what red-blooded Amercian isn’t (whether you want to be or not)?

Australian Record Label Presents Two New Records From Two Old-Timers

Lost and Lonesome has just put out two records, one by former Lucksmith Mark Monnone who is going by the moniker Monnone Alone called Pink Earrings. Not surprisingly it sounds kinda like the Lucksmiths, expect Monnnone sings.  While you’re checking that out, be sure to consider the latest from Bart and Friends. Bart Cummings of Cat’s Miaow and the Shapiros ended his long silence last year with Make You Blush is back again with a 10 inch EP called Stories With the Endings Changed.

Get Your Medical Records

Much has been written about Medical Records here in Seattle, but I’m not sure if the word has gotten out beyond Seattle and in the know circles of  “classic synth, cosmic disco, wave (cold/new), and future music” aficionados. So far, the Seattle label specializing in reissuing nearly forgotten synth records, has released eight albums by Guyer’s Connection, OGI, Der Plan, Chrisma, Deutsche Wertarbeit, and  Alexander Robotnick.  All the records are limited to around 500 copies, and come in some very pretty shades of vinyl. Many are already sold out so head on over, have a listen and see what’s left.

Geoffrey O’Connor Comes Out of the Crayon Fields

Crayon Fields frontman Geoffrey O’Connor takes a break from his band to cut loose and get icy cold and synthy. The first song is a study in cool, suave and sophisticated. Can’t wait to hear the whole album. It’s called Vanity Is Forever and is out in September.

mp3: Geoffrey O’Connor – Now and Then (from Vanity is Forever on Chapter Music)

Fests and Parties

The Capitol Hill Block Party is this weekend in Seattle. It’s three days beginning this Friday. I’m heading up on Friday for sure, and may go Saturday (the afore mentioned Hausu play Saturday) as well depending on my ability to tolerate large festivals. A festival more my size is the third annual Pizza Fest which takes place Funhouse August 4-6. The line-up is pretty sweet if you’re into garage, punk and fun. Not sure if they’re having a pizza eating contest like last year, but I’m sure you’ll be able to get a slice along with a Rainier and some ringing ears.

Servants Are Served Up Again

Captured Tracks has a pretty relentless release schedule so keeping up can be a chore. Glad to see the label doing god’s work in releasing long lost gems from years ago in addition to the many new bands they release. The Servants ran with the C-86 crowd and actually were on that now legendary cassette.  The band’s Cherry Red compilation has been long out of print, so Captured Tracks has picked up the slack and  just released a record that collects the majority of  their recorded output. It’s called Youth Club Disco.

mp3: The Servants – The Sun, A Small Star (from Youth Club Disco on Captured Tracks)

Get Your Swimsuit

Michigan’s Swimsuit have just released their debut album. Besides having my favorite cover of any record this year, it contains some pretty good songs as well. Yeah, reverb heavy surf inspired music is kinda played out, but give them a break, you can only surf on a great lake if there’s a big storm.

Tiny Microphone Finally Gets a Non-Cassette Release. Still Wait For Vinyl

You may remember Tiny Microphone from a few years ago when we did the One Last Kiss redo.  Tiny Microphone is Kristine Capua (also of Very Truly Yours). Tiny Microphone are like twee-shoegaze and I mean that in the best way. Up until now you could only get her Home album on cassette from Italian label Best Kept Secret, but now Japanese label Happy Prince has released it on CD. Expect a vinyl version to come along in another three years…

2010: My Year In Records

Looking at the lists from the indie cognoscenti this year my eyes tend to get heavy and it becomes hard to stay awake. I’m beginning to see why my grandfather wasn’t able to stay awake when he watched the Dukes of Hazzard with me when I was a kid. I’m not quite to that point yet, as I was able to keep myself lucid long enough to compile my top 25 albums of the year. Have at it.

1. Eddy Current Suppression Ring – Rush To Relax (Goner)
Some long-time fans have quipped that Rush To Relax isn’t as good as its predecessor Primary Colors, but for me this was the year of Eddy Current Suppression Ring.  Finding Rush to Relax in the used bin for 99 cents was the start.  Next Anxiety whacked me on the head with its brute force, then their longer jams like Turning Out and Second Guessing bowled me over, and if that wasn’t enough they beguiled with the heartfelt politeness of I Can Be a Jerk and Gentleman.  Finally their status was cemented by their live show at Vera Project.  In a dry house following two hardcore punk bands, the band put on a clinic on how to rock out with their solid rhythm section, slicing guitars and unique gloved front man. Nobody came close to Eddy Current Suppression Ring this year.

mp3: Anxiety

2. Intelligence – Males (In The Red)
Well, the Intelligence came kinda close.  Lars and company pumped up the fidelity on record number six and came out all the better for it.  For the first time ever this was a full band and the claustrophobic weirdness that permeates all previous Intelligence records was stretched, torn and punctured to create new sounds.  Fidelity aside,  this batch of songs with the likes of Tuned to Puke, Like Like Like…, The Beetles and Estate Sales may be the strongest yet.

mp3: Tuned to Puke

3. Edwyn Collins – Losing Sleep (Heavenly)
After suffering a stroke, Edwyn Collins may not have his guitar playing skills back yet, but his songwriting and singing skills are have returned fully intact.  Losing Sleep sees Collins enlisting the help of friends like Johnny Marr, The Cribs, Franz Ferdinand, Roddy Frame, Drums to name a few.  At first it was kind of a surprise to hear Collins duet with so many of his guests, but the album’s sound is so cohesive it doesn’t distract because you can tell that Ryan Jarmin, Alex Kapranos, Romeo Stodart and Jonathon Pierce are such Collins fans.

mp3: Losing Sleep

4. Les Cox Sportifs – Scheiss Mit Reis (Sea)
Les Cox Sportifs caught my imagination, and no it wasn’t their name that did it.  Their sparsly played rhythmic songs and odd lyrics put them defiantly in the weird corner and that’s a corner I gravitate to.  Their combining of Bo Diddly, the Fall, Modern Lovers, Yummy Fur and Country Dick Montana was a soup that I kept lapping up all year long.

mp3: John E Millais

5. Kellies – Kellies (Rastrillo/Crang)
The self-titled third album from this Argentinian all girl band was part post punk, part art school, and should have come with a warning label because every song contains a deadly hook.  Why have you not heard of these ladies you may ask.  That’s a damn good question, and if you’ve been around these parts much, you probably have.

mp3: Hit It Off

6. Eternal Summers – Silver (Kanine)
Roanoak, Virginia’s Eternal Summers are  the simple combination of guitar and drums, but are most certainly more than the sum of their parts and  a good reason for that is Nicole Yun’s big confident voice. First single Pogo was big and catchy and the immediacy of Disciplinarian and the moodiness and beauty of songs like Salty and Bully In Disguise keep you firmly planted.

mp3: Pogo

7. Race Horses – Goodbye Falkenburg (FantasticPlastic)
Formerly known as Radio Luxembourg, Race Horses broke out of the gate this year with their first album Goodbye Faulkenberg.  Being from Wales you might guess they have a psychedelic leaning the same as Super Furry Animals and Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci and you would be right but they carve out their own  niche of strange beguiling pop too. Actually it’s more like a wide swath that ranges from Love, Dexy’s, Can, Mahler, Gilber & Sullivan, Scott Walker and Os Mutantes to name a few of the records they list on the inner sleeve as influences on this album.

mp3: Cake

8. Kelley Stoltz – To Dreamers (Sub Pop)
Seems like every year Kelley Stoltz puts out a record it ends up as one of my favorites.  I write something about how he conjours the past with songs that evoke the likes of the Kinks, Harry Nilson and Fred Neil.  With To Dreamers Stoltz does it again with seeming ease, but he incorporates more lush orchestration this time,  does a little krautrock, and includes a cover of Big Boy Pete’s 1965 lost classic Baby I Got News for You even doing some sleuthing to pull in Pete Miller to play on it. I keep expecting the well to run dry for Stoltz, but it looks like he’s in no danger of that.

mp3: I Remember, You Were Wild

9. Sourpatch – Crushin’ (Happy Happy Birthday To Me)
San Jose’s Sourpatch probably at some point  have made a pilgrimage to Sacramento to pay tribute to Tiger Trap and Rocketship.  After doing so they came back home and made this record.  Their ability to conjure that sound from that time might be called nostalgic by some but these kids are way too young to hold any nostalgia for the 90’s.  Crushin’ is just some kids from San Jose making beautiful twee racket.

mp3: Crushin’

10. Weekend – Sports (Slumberland)
Sports begins with an unassuming jangle. Soon an eerie howl is heard in the distance and then it becomes more prominent.  At about a minute and a half in, the jangle turns into a buzz-saw and the howl to piercing growl.  Weekend don’t lift their collective boot from your neck over the next 45 minutes.  Sports pummels but like someone that doesn’t know what’s good for them I keep coming back for more.

mp3: Coma Summer

11. Wounded Lion – Wounded Lion (In the Red)
Wounded Lion are probably a little too weird to ever go mainstream, that’s why they’re on this list.  Jokes aside, Wounded Lion killer modern day Modern Lovers fueled rock brings it.  No filler here: The one-two punch of Hungry? and Creatures In the Cave is hard to resist. Degobah System must have been unjustly cut from Star Wars Episode IV and Pony People (having been on a now out of print S-S seven inch) Those are only a few reasons I love this record.

mp3: Hungry

12. Young Sinclairs – Chimeys (Chimney Sweep)
The Young Sinclairs are the vehicle of Sam Lunsford who over the last four years has self-released loads of cd-r’s and tapes. Last year Kindercore put out an LP that cherry picked the best tracks from those releases giving them a little larger audience.  Finally the band endeavored to release and album on the Chimney Sweep label on vinyl this year.  Chimey’s is psychedelia done so well it will make you think of so many bands like them that have gone before.  It will also have you searching through your closet for those paisley shirts you hope you never threw out.

mp3: Future Man

13. Frankie Rose & the Outs – Frankie Rose And The Outs (Slumberland)
I must say that after seeing Frankie Rose and the Outs at SXSW this year I wasn’t really looking forward to her album.  Everything was drenched in reverb to the point of barely being able to make out the songs. There is no such problem with this album.  It is a sublime record that eschews the ramshackle garage sound of her former band and goes for a more classic sound and totally succeeds.

mp3: Candy

14. Boston Spaceships – Our Cubehouse Still Rocks (GBVI)
Funny how my interest in Robert Pollard ebbs and flows.  There was a high point in the 90’s and then it dipped in 00’s. Now that we’re in the 10’s Pollard is back in my good graces and Our Cubehouse Still Rocks is a prime example as to why.  While everyone was running around talking about the Guided By Voices reunion, this album was released and criminally ignored. It rivals and surpasses the last five GBV albums.

mp3: Track Star

15. Cinema Red & Blue – Cinema Red & Blue (What’s Your Rupture)
I hesitate to call this a supergroup, but it’s a pretty damn good one.  David Feck of Comet Gain, comes over to New York and gets some Crystal Stilts, Ladybug Transistors and one Amy Linton to help out on this album. Apparently it was recorded in a week, but it has warmth and familiarity like these old friends have been playing together for years.

mp3: Ballad Of A Bus Stop

16. Allow Darlin’ – Allo Darlin’ (Fortuna Pop)
Allo Darlin’ sealed the deal with their rousing show at the Jewelbox Theatre in Seattle this fall. Their slightly twee, slightly country ukulele driven songs have a sweet niavty to them that makes you want them to take them under your wing and give them a good home.  My copy has found one on my stereo and it’s even muscled out a few lesser records from the cd player.

mp3: The Polaroid Song

17. Standard Fare – Noyelle Beat (Melodic/Bar None)
This and Allo Darlin were like sister records for me this year.  I couldn’t think about one without the other popping into my head.  Standard Fare packed a little more muscle, but it was coming from the same place. Well maybe not the exact same place when you consider their song 15 is about falling for a teenager.  Not your typical indiepop.

mp3: Fifteen

18. Art Museums – Rough Frame (Woodsist)
This record was a pleasant surprise, evoking the Television Personalities and early Creation records. It’s short at only nine songs, but it left a lasting impression on me.  The songs are done in low key, lo-fi way.  The steely guitars and programmed drums provide a synthetic psychedelic feel.  The vocals strain to reach the high notes, but the songs are warm, fuzzy and earnest which makes these part-time punks’ debut hard not to like.

mp3: Sculpture Gardens

19. Fresh & Onlys – Play It Strange (In the Red)
The Fresh & Onlys are still way too prolific for their own good.  I feel like we’ve seen them grow up before our eyes.  Where some bands hold back releasing songs, choosing to keep a stash in case of writer’s block, the Fresh & Onlys lay it all on the line putting everything out for better of for worse.  After two diluted albums last year, the band chose to only release one album this year and are the better for it.  Every song is autumnal intoxication and their secret weapon guitarist Wymond Miles astounds throughout with his leads.

mp3: Waterfall

20. The Lights – Failed Graves (Wantage)
The Lights have been trolling around the seedy side Seattle for quite a while.  Ten years on and Failed Graves is only the band’s third album but my favorite so far.  There were more than a couple times this year when I was standing either in the Funhouse or the Sunset watching them storm through a set thinking that they were the best live band going in Seattle right now.  Craig Chambers in a suit looking like a huckster that plays a mean guitar, Jeff Albertson firecly clutching his well worn bass while PJ Rogalski wailed on the drums.  The intensity on Failed Graves nearly replicates their live show.  Dissonant guitars, pummeling rhythm section come at you through the speakers and the needle threatens to fly from the record.

mp3: Famous Gunshots

21. Gigi – Maintenant (Tomlab)
After this album I am convinced that Nick Krgovich of No Kids is a pop maestro.  How else could he write and orchestrate an album like this.   The songs have a 60’s Phil Spector feel crossed with Cole Porter, putting him in a league with Stephen Merrit’s Sixths albums.  There are too many highlights to list here, but the Rose Melberg sung Alone At the Pier, Karl Blau doing The Old Graveyard and Zac Pennington’s Dreams of Romance are already classics in my house.

mp3: The Old Graveyard

22. Deerhunter – Halcyon Digest (4AD)
4AD does not carry the cache that it once did, but Earthquake the first song on Halcyon Digest totally evokes that label’s heyday, sounding like Dif Juz, Cocteau Twins and This Mortal Coil all at once.  Bradford Cox is up to his old shoegaze tricks on Halcyon digest, but it’s Locket Pundt’s songs that lifted this album to the top of the stack this time.  Desire Lines and Fountain Stairs offer hazy bursts of sunshine to Cox’s Halcyon gauze.

mp3: Desire Lines

23. The Limiñanas – The Limiñanas (Trouble In Mind)
Je Ne Puis Pas Trés Drogué.  Well I am after this record.  The Limiñanas is full of hallucinogens, twelve doses to be precise. I hope their record label doesn’t get arrested for sending these things via the US Postal Service.  It could be a real scandal. I can see the headlines now: American Label implicated in French drug trafficking.  Giant hits of acid found in the form of 33 rpm records.  I ordered 10 copies.

mp3: Down Underground

24. Super Wild Horses – Fifteen (Hozac)
At first glance you might say Australia’s Super Wild Horses take their cue from the riot grrrl movement of the early 90’s, but their sound and style goes a little further harking back to that movement’s predecessors like the Breeders and Scrawl.  The grrrl duo switch off  between minimal drums and minimal guitar to deliver short sharp shocks trading off vocals and harmonizing on songs that transcend their primal beginnings. Not sure how much Mikey Young of Eddy Current Suppression Ring who twiddled the knobs on this record had to do with the magic that Fifteen conjures, but if I were a betting man I would say not very much.

mp3: Goldentown

25. Ty Segall – Melted (Goner)
Like the Fresh & Onlys, Ty Segall came of age in 2010, albeit at a much younger age.  Melted is where Segall got off the garage bus and tripped onto the magic buss.  Don’t get me wrong, he still rocks out, but it’s in full technicolor instead of the previous black and white.  Songs like Bees are meaty beaty big and bouncy and Sad Fuzz rains down on you like he’s finally gotten to the point of being able to incorporate those top shelf influences into his songs. Listening to Melted you can  see that Segall freed his mind and the possibilities are endless.

mp3: Caesar

Honorable Mentions:
Magic Bullets – Magic Bullets (Mon Amie) / Lawrence Arabia – Chant Darling (Bella Union) / Wild Nothing – Gemini (Captured Tracks) / Rose Elinor Dougall – Whithout Why (Scarlett) / Idle Times – Idle Times (Hozac) /  Radio Dept. – Clinging To a Scheme (Labrador) / Seinking Ships – Museum Quality Capture (S-curve) / Dum Dum Girls – I Will Be (Sub Pop) / Splinters – Kick (Double Negative) / Math and Physics Club – I Shouldn’t Look As Good As I Do (Matinee) / Katerine – Phillippe Katerine (Barclay) / The Fall – Your Future Our Clutter (Domino) / White Wires – WWII (Dirtnap) / Dead Ghosts – Dead Ghosts (Florida’s Dying) / Harlem – Hippies (Matador) / Vic Godard – & Subway Sect – We Come As Aliens (Overground)

I Didn’t Know You Could Get That Film Anymore

Allo Darlin’, Math & Physics Club, Special Places at Jewelbox Theater, Seattle | 29 October 2010

If there is a more perfect place than the tiny Jewelbox Theater to enjoy the precious pop of the likes of London’s Allo Darlin’ and Seattle’s Math & Physics Club and Perfect Places it likely only exists in my imagination or some storybook. After providing the secret knock to the theater door I entered into a Seattle’s small but familial indiepop world. Allo Darlin were a long way from home and I can only imagine here because of the enthusiasm of Three Imaginary Girls who booked the sold out show.
Allo Darlin’s album on Fortuna Pop came out earlier this year. It was recorded in the basement of the Duke of Uke shop in London, where people like Darren Haymen, and the Wave Pictures like to hang out and a place where Allo Darlin singer and ukulele player Elizabeth Morris probably had her choice of ukuleles to play while recording. Morris started off the set solo with a new song she called Talulah, that contained a line about listening to that Go-Betweens album on cassette. Usually I would assume that a song with an obscure reference to a Go-Betweens album would be lost on the audience, but I think it’s safe to assume that everyone in the room got it. The song was about as gentle and tender Allo Darlin would be this night.
The rest of the band then joined her on stage for what they referred to a slow-burn of a set. A slow burn according to the band is gradually turning up the heat as the night goes on. Their self-titled album on Fortuana Pop is fun and similar to Camera Obscura, but where Camera Obscura are stiff and standoffish on stage Allo Darlin’ are the types to put their arms around your shoulders and pogo with you until you’re out of breath. I don’t think I’ve ever seen a bass player jump so high and still keep a beat as Mr. Bill Botting did. A good thing the place had a high roof because He and Morrise would get in sync on their jumping nearly every song and their verticals had to be about one and half to two feet. The band were definitely having a good time and everyone there to see them couldn’t help but have a good time too. Songs like Kiss Your Lips and If Loneliness Was Art raged full on almost making you question their twee roots. On the Polaroid Song they snuck in the chorus to the Bangles‘ Walk Like an Egyptian to everyone’s delight and the band’s as well as they were all grinning ear to ear.  It was infectious, even after they left the stage and denied us of an encore, I couldn’t seem to wipe the giant grin from my face.

mp3: Allo Darlin – If Loneliness Was Art (from their Fortuna Pop album, buy the CD  here or the vinyl here)

Hometown boys Math & Physics Club must have drawn the short straw back stage having to follow Allo Darlin, but their sublime understated set was a delight.  This was the first chance that I got to hear the new songs from their second album I Shouldn’t Look As Good As I Do live.  Maybe I pay more attention to guitars these days, but I don’t remember them sporting Rickenbackers.  Both James and Charles had shiny and shimmering ones and they looked as good as they sounded.  Another thing I noticed that I had either forgotten or never picked up on was how meaty and bouncy the bass lines were.  Before the final song when Ethan Jones and James Werle switched instruments, Jones noted as he picked up Werle’s guitar how his kid brother’s friend said to him when he found out Jones was in Math and Physics Club how his favorite MAPC bass line was for the one song he didn’t play bass.  I was hoping that they would have come back out with Allo Darlin for a rousing rendition of We’re So DIY with Elizabeth Morris singing the Ya, oh ya’s while Tullycraft were in the audience.  No such luck.  No encores from Math and Physics Club either, but I counted myself fortunate having seen them as their appearances around town are all too rare.

mp3: Math & Physics Club – We’re So DIY (from their album I Shouldn’t Look As Good As I Do, buy it from Matinee)

I shouldn’t complain, half of Tullycraft, Jenny & Cori opened the show as the Special Places.  Jenny was sporting a newly acquired accordion which she said she just learned to play a few days before.  The keys had stickers on them to remind her where to put her fingers as Cori pointed out after a false start.  Their set was totally DIY and off the cuff, but their acoustic songs  felt like a breath of fresh air wafting through the the tiny theater.