Rolling Coastal Blacking Out or Something Like That

April 2, 2017 at 6:30 pm | Posted in Australia, Music, Seattle, Shows | 4 Comments
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One thing about Melbourne, Australia’s Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever is that I can never seem to get their name right. It doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, you know. How many bands have four word names these days? People are lucky enough to be able to remember two word band names. It seems that their US label Sub Pop realizes this, shortening the band’s name for their US debut to Rolling Blackouts C.F. I don’t know if this is better though. It isn’t a whole lot easier to remember, and it gives the impression that there is already a band named Coastal Blackouts and these Blackouts are from some country with the initials C.F.

Another thing about Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever is that they jangle. You hear the likely suspects (Bats, Clean, & Feelies) in their sound, but their jangle comes from a more classic rock corner of the universe. Their sound can best be described by the Close Lobsters‘ cover of Neil Young‘s Hey Hey, My My (Into the Black). They sound like they’ve done their time on the bar circuit, and taken their lumps winning over hard drinking, blue collar fellows in dungarees.

One more thing about Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, they’re show this past Tuesday at Barboza here in Seattle was a lot of fun. The five piece band featured three guitarists and singers, but their secret weapon, which all great bands will attest to, was their rhythm section. Every song was anchored by some great bass riffs which was really apparent live. That firm mooring allowed the guitarists to really go into their hyper-manic-riff mode trading licks and often vocal spots. This band seems to be very well oiled machine.

One final thing about Rolling Blackouts Coastal Fever, they do a mighty fine cover of the Orange Juice classic Blueboy!

Seattle’s designated openers for all Australian jangly type bands, Zebra Hunt did just that. On this night I found out:

    • In Australia, zebra is pronounced with a short ‘e’.
    • Zebra Hunt’s second LP is coming out May 19.
    • The band now seems to be a permanent four piece.
    • They have got a brand new set of songs that rivals the ones the made me fan in the first place.
    • They just keep getting better!
    • They might actually be Australian judging from their ace cover of the Go-Betweens‘ Was There Anything I Could Do?

Robert Forster’s Ten Best

May 31, 2015 at 9:30 pm | Posted in Lists, Music, Ten Best | 4 Comments
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Last week I was reading a list of the top ten Stereolab songs that somebody put together for the Stereogum site. I disagreed with 90 percent of the choices. So I thought to myself, I should make a list that you can disagree with 90 percent of the selections. With the Go-Betweens you either lean towards Robert Forester or Grant McLennan. The younger me was a McLennan guy, the older me is most certainly a Forester disciple. Since McLennan’s untimely death Forster is all we’ve got. He’s reportedly working on his sixth solo album so what better reason to choose him for this first semi-irregular installment of Ten Best.

10. Make Her Day (Go-Betweens – Bright Yellow Bright Orange -2003)
This comes from one of the slighter Go-Betweens albums, their second reunion album. This song flew under my radar until I saw them play it live on what became their final tour of the US. It was at the Triple Door here in Seattle. Forster counted it off tapping his boot against the stage floor. The jangling warmness filled the room and this song just bloomed. This recorded version doesn’t quite reach those heights I experienced seeing it performed live that night, but it is close. A shame they buried at the end of Bright Yellow Bright Orange.

9. Warm Nights (Robert Forster – Warm Nights -1996)
I remember when Warm Nights came out and how disappointed many were about it. After all, it was a Robert Forster album produced by Edwyn Collins. It had to be good. I guess we were expecting something else. Hindsight provides some clarity thankfully. The slight country tinge is something Forster has explored a lot on his solo records and that is present here, but there is also Television-esque guitar that gives this song a different feel than much of his catalog. His previous record was an all covers album titled I Had a New York Girlfriend, but this is his most New York sounding song he ever wrote.

8. Dear Black Dream (Robert Forster – Danger In the Past -1990)
Dear Black Dream comes from Forster’s first solo album. After the breakup of the Go-Betweens he went to Germany and recorded it with Mick Harvey of the the Bad Seeds. It was well known that Forster was the one who often struggled with writers block while McLennan seems to have an endless supply of songs. So it was kind of surprising that Danger In the Past bettered McLennan’s Watershed. Dear Black Dream has a gospel feel to it, like he’s elated to have come out of the murk of being in the under appreciated Go-Betweens and the idea of wide open roads ahead brought excitement and hope to his song writing.

7. Surfing Magazines (Go-Betweens – Friends of Rachel Worth -2000)
This song comes from the Go-Betweens’s first album after reuniting after 12 years apart and four solo albums. Surfing Magazines successfully unites the whimsy of adolescent dreams of being a surf bum and dropping off of the grid with becoming an adult and the knowledge that those were just dreams. You get the feeling from the song’s poignancy that he thinks he should have really been a surfer, or at least still wonders what might have been.

6. Spring Rain (Go-Betweens – Liberty Belle And The Black Diamond Express -1986)
McLennan and Forester both had distinct styles, but every once in a while they would write a song that sounded like the other one. Spring Rain had a killer hook and beautiful guitar solo that gave you the feeling that the two were living closely together. This was written after they’d moved to London from Brisbane so they probably were.

5. The Circle (Robert Forster Calling from a Country Phone -1993)
Forster’s second album is his best one and unfortunately the only one that was never released in the US. Go figure, the curse of the Go-Betweens continues I guess. The Circle married the pop smarts of the Go-Betweens with country twang and charm. He seems like he’s having fun, like he did when he sang odes to Lee Remick and Karen.

4. People Say (Go-Betweens second 7″ single -1979)
In the liner notes of the Go-Betweens best of 1978-1990, Forster said that, “Sometimes I think this is the best song I’ve ever written.” I couldn’t agree more. It’s got a great old time organ throughout and the line “The clouds lie on their backs, rain on everyone, But you always stay dry, You got your own private own sun” which is a classic. Not bad for the second single out of the gate.

3. Darlinghurst Nights (Go-Betweens – Oceans Apart -2005)
If under duress and I had to pick a favorite Go-Betweens album, I might pick their final album Oceans Apart. That is due to the number of high quality Forster songs on it. The best one is Darlinghurst Nights, which is a tour through the past that begins with an acoustic guitar and Forster opening a notebook and progresses into a frenzy of horns while people and places streak by. It’s a glimpse of the past that like all great songs, provides more questions than answers.

2. Lee Remick (Go-Betweens first 7″ single -1978)
Forster wrote both sides of the first Go-Betweens single. This was the A-side. A Two and a half minute ode to a screen jem of the past. “She was in The Omen with Gregory Peck, She got killed, what the heck?!” Not taking himself too seriously, and not knowing that he had a written a classic song at his first go. The song that launched a thousand indiepop groups.

1. Draining The Pool For You (Go-Betweens – Spring Hill Fair -1984)
Forster as the pool boy. Not for long, because he knows that he’s too smart for this kind of gig. Of course it’s analogy for many of life’s unfair predicaments. Here Forster takes the mundane experience of pool cleaning and makes it into an ode of contempt. He’s draining the pool, but not the way you think. He’s got a chip on his shoulder, knowing that these Hollywood stars could just as easily be draining the pool for him.

So Much Water So Close To Home

January 28, 2015 at 5:27 pm | Posted in Albums, Music, Seattle, Vinyl | Leave a comment
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After a couple singles, Zebra Hunt, the Pacific Northwest’s foremost purveyors of the Dunnedin sound have released an album. City Sighs has obviously been influenced by the classic Flying Nun sound of the early 80’s made famous by the Clean, the Verlaines and the Chills, but it also incorporates some distinctly American sounds to create a fresh variation on a well worn style.

City Sighs seems to be an album full of jangle, longing and discovery. It’s full of pop songs that are instantly likable and easy to remember. Deleware starts the record and opines for a lost friend who’s up and moved back to the first state in the Union. Singer Robert Mercer sings just enough (and leaves even more unsaid) to get you wondering why this person left. It has an air of mystery to it like a Raymond Carver story. The American influences aren’t just literary. Call It Off is a dusty rocker that has Long Ryders feel to it and Isle of Song and Always both owe a little something to Galaxy 500. The band also rightfully resurrect Half Right and Beaches of LA, two of their best songs that originally appeared on their first single that came out on the now defunct Manic Pop label.

The last song Haze Of Youth may be my favorite song on the album. Starting out as pop and then transitioning into a long jam, it out real estates Real Estate. City Sighs is being released by the tiny Tenorio Cotobade label in Madrid, Spain, so you probably won’t see this record at your local shop unless you live in Seattle, but it deserves as much exposure and recognition as like minded records (on much larger labels) by the Twerps and Real Estate.

Vinyl & Download available from Tenorio Cotobade.
Download available from Zebra Hunt’s bandcamp.

If you’re near Seattle this weekend, don’t miss Zebra Hunt Saturday at Hilliard’s in Ballard.

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Sea Breezes and Comet Scars

May 17, 2013 at 9:13 am | Posted in Albums, Australia, Music | 3 Comments
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Wild Nothing‘s Nowhere single from last year was an obvious tribute to the Go-Betweens. Australia’s Dick Diver have done one better. An entire album that could be construed as a tribute to that great band. The Melbourne quartet is the primary band of Rupert Edwards and Al McKay. They get help from the moonlighting Steph Hughs (Boomgates) and Al Montfort (Lower Plenty, The UV Race, Total Control and Straightjacket Nation). All four members contribute songs to the record which provides some variety, but for the most part they are all on the same chapter in the same book. Calendar Days their second album, came out in March to a quiet reception over hear in the US mostly because they don’t have a record label here.

They have been described by some as Australian strummy music. I’m not sure if it was meant as a compliment or not but it captures their sound in a nutshell. Doesn’t everyone love a good strum once in a while? What does strummy actually mean? In the case of Dick Diver: blue, laid-back, playful and breezy. They will make your heart ache. In fact, they could have put a sticker on the cover stating: Warning. May cause slight bouts of melancholia. There is nothing wrong with being blue though. Sometimes you need a little dose of the blues to make you appreciate the better times and this record seems to tug you into reflection with its easy melodies. Many bands worry about a sophomore slump, but Dick Diver sound like they really know what they’re doing the second time around.

Dick-Diver cover
stream: Dick Diver – Lime Green Shirt (from Calendar Days out on Chapter Music in Australia)

Boomgates Do It Naturally

September 27, 2012 at 10:41 pm | Posted in Australia, Music, Track-by-track | 1 Comment
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There is something about certain Australian bands and records: The Go-Betweens‘ 16 Lovers Lane, Paul Kelly and Coloured Girls‘ Gossip, the Triffids’ Born Sandy Devotional, the Church‘s Of Skins and Heart, the Lucksmiths‘ Warmer Corners, the Saints‘ I’m Stranded, Twerps‘ debut, Eddy Current Suppression Ring‘s Rush to Relax. A diverse set of albums, but all them have something about them that sets them apart and makes them distinctly Australian. They have a sense of  urgency and isolation, a poetry about them and a way of sounding laid-back while singing about intense and decidedly unlaid-back  topics in their songs.  Yes, you could argue that the Saints and ECR don’t sound laid back, but the Saints brand of punk had a sense of space and playfulness about it (especially on their second album) that set it apart from your typical punk band of the day.

The Boomgates debut album released earlier this month on Bedroom Suck deserves to be included in this list of great Australian records.It’s a ray of sunshine, a faded photo, a favorite tattered shirt, a perfect companion and a kick in the pants. So good, I had to go track by track to review it.

Flood Plain – could be about a relationship, the downfall of our civilization or simply about how some people inexplicably build their houses in flood plains. The take-away of course is don’t think it can’t happen to you because the next 100 year flood is right around the corner.

Layman’s Terms – This gets a dust off from last year’s 7-inch, but even I, who listened to this song way too many times on a 7-inch have not grown tired of this beauty that harkens back to the Go-Betweens beauty.

Cows Come Home – This one reminds me a little of a Bats or Magic Heads song (“Hold all the butter till the cows come home” anyone?). Steph Hughes voice is so sweet on this, Huntly’s spoken word part lends some gravity, and the line “Because I’m a hundred years old” lends a sense that this was written by an old soul

Natural Progression – The guitar riff sounds like a super slowed down ECR song. “I got stuck in a lift went down”. Huntly and Hughes sing the entire song together and there are parts where it sounds like he’s dominating and parts where she does. There are some great harmonies that remind me a little of Free Design and Veronica Falls. Self-doubt ensues, “I’m making mountains out of mole hills”

Cartons and Cans – A song about recycling? No, of course not.  “There are so many things I should do that should have already done.” The whistling is flawlessly done. Any band that can incorporate a whistling part and not make you cringe is operating at higher level.

Whispering and Singing – Side two kicks off with a freight train through the bedroom.  Huntly sing’s “Don’t know when you’re leaving” and it sounds like a train whistle while the rhythm section chugs along. Firehose wrote a song called Whisperin’ and Hollerin’. Whispering and Singing probably has nothing to do with Firehose, but it reminds me of them and this is a good thing. Boomgates are ragin’ full-on here.

Hold Me Now – Not the Thompson Twins song. This is a nice one, but it’s kind of a break from the full-on, no let up that this record has been to this point. Even a lesser song by the Boomgates sounds pretty good. Expertly sequenced to allow for a rest, and quite a nice siesta it is.

Hanging Rock – Jangly into. “I gave it all with my genuine leather, you gave me more with your 100% cotton blend.” Friends become lovers, pull their socks up to picknick at a Hanging Rock and then fall apart. Infatuation and those first moments. Newness and the constant search for that initial feeling. Fleeting. That’s why it’s so great. Anything that good and intense will never last. Well maybe it will if you pull your socks up and keep listening.

Everything – “All the dishes keep piling in the sink”, reminds me of my college days. Living with five other guys and no one would do their dishes. Man, it made me feel like dying old. The drums keep building and building while the guitars get more intense. Finally either someone dies or does the dishes. I’d like to think that he did the dishes before he died.

Any Excuse – Every album needs a great closing song. Actually does it? Does anyone listen to a record all the way through in a sitting. I do, and I appreciate it when a band has the sense to put a song at the end that sounds like it should go at the end. The guitar sounds like it was directly lifted from the Velvet Underground which is no bad thing. It also has a little bit of a honky-tonk feel to it.  Huntly ends up in a two minute refrain about turning the soil, watering your garden, giving it love, and watching it grow.  Amen!

The Boomgates album is out in Australia. If you live there hit up Bedroom Suck. In the States head to Goner or Amazon if you’re looking for mp3’s.

Aught Not To Forget: The Most Underrated Records of the Decade

November 30, 2009 at 10:09 pm | Posted in Aughts, Best of, mp3, Music | 24 Comments
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I was going to do a list of my favorite records of the 00’s, but as I was getting my list together I started to realize it was kind of boring.  Really, how many music blogs do you need to tell you the same thing? That’s when I began thinking about the records that came out over last 10 years that I thought were criminally ignored, or just didn’t seem to get a fair shake.   So what I’ve got for you is a list of my most underrated albums of the decade. Every one of these records shoulda been a hit, but because the world is a cruel, cruel place they never were.

Putting this list together was a lot of fun, because it allowed me to make amends for some records that I missed the year they came out.  There is not a year that goes by that I don’t discover my favorite album from the previous year in March of the next year.  And so it goes….you’ll find a lot albums on this list that never made one of my year end lists from the past ten years.  I can assure you though, that everyone of these would make my top 100 albums of the aughts. I just thought focusing on the underdogs would be a little more interesting than seeing some list with the same records as every other list out there.  Hope that I have half-succeeded. Oh, and yeah, I know that the decade is officially over at the end of 2010, but I start counting at zero.

It’s Jo and DannyLank Haired Girl To Bearded Boy (2000: Double Snazzy)

This was one of those buys where I was in a record store flipping through CD’s and saw a cover that caught my eye.  I remember opening it up and seeing that Dan Treacy of Television Personalities had written the liner notes and thinking, that it’s got to be good.  Unheard, I bought this at some overpriced record shop in Paris (I’m so cosmopolitan) and it soon thereafter became my favorite record for months on end.  It’s got elements of Mazzy Star and shoegaze, but seems to carve out it’s own space making it kind of unclassifiable and kinda special.  They would put out three more albums in the decade, but none came as close to perfection as Lank Haired Girl.  To this day, I have no idea which one is Jo and which one is Danny.

mp3: It’s Jo & Danny – Repentant Song

mp3: It’s Jo & Danny – Solar Plexus

The FallThe Unutterable (2000: Eagle)

It’s just like Mark E Smith to come back from near disaster with an amazing album. After being arrested for assault of his then girlfriend Julia Nagel in New York and having his long time band quit on him Smith returned with an entire new band and the Unutterable. He’d done it before, releasing Extricate after Brix left him, so there is some sort of precedence. It’s amazing how the Fall can still sound vital some 30 years into it, but they do, and this is example number one for the aughts (see also Heads Roll and Country on the Click).

mp3: The Fall – Cyber Insekt

mp3: The Fall – Dr. Buck’s Letter

MooseHigh Ball Me (2000: Le Grand Magistery)

Moose never officially broke up, so I still hold out hope.  High Ball Me was their fourth and last album. All three previous records were criminally ignored, so why should this one be any different.  The perennial underdogs, Moose made such great albums to the delight of those lucky enough to hear them.   High Ball Me is no different except that this one got released not only in the UK but in the US, a first for the band.  There was no slide in quality on High Ball Me.  Incorporating Nilson, Buckly, Hazlewood and House of Love into an intricate wall of sound that Phil Spector would envy.  It’s downright lush!

mp3: Moose -Can’t Get Enough of You

mp3: Moose -Pretend We Never Met

Broadcast The Noise Made By People (2000: Warp)

Before Broadcast became a laptop band, they were actually a real band and The Noise Made By People was the culmination of their autumnal space-age pop.  It had an icy cold and unfeeling demeanor like Nico, but there was a glow to it like the Mamas and the Papas and a fiery intensity like Jefferson Airplane.  You get the picture, it has a definite 60’s feel to it, but it has it without sounding too derivative.  I remember seeing them at the Knitting Factory in LA for their tour to promote the album, and Broadcast as a full band in a live setting so greatly surpassed what they had put down on tape.  Trish Keenan’s voice, the retro light show, the noise created by the keyboards, but mostly the guitars filled the room with a hazy shade of winter.  Take note chillwave/laptop groups, you need a band, otherwise it’s just watching a guy clicking a mouse.

mp3: Broadcast – Come On Let’s Go

mp3: Broadcast – Echo’s Answer

Goldfrapp Felt Mountain (2000: Mute)

Some of the sounds on Goldfrapp’s debut album are otherworldly. It’s all strings and computers, but it sounds like it came from outer space.  Outer space circa circa 1960, something akin to Peter Thomas’s soundtrack to Raumpatrouille.  Alisson Goldfrapp looks like she could have been a Bond girl and has a voice to match. Before making Felt Mountain with Will Gregory, she had appeared on albums by Tricky and Orbital, so this record and its cinematic trip hop didn’t come out of nowhere, but the yodeling kind of did.

mp3: Goldfrapp -Lovely Head

mp3: Goldfrapp – Utiopia

The Aislers SetThe Last Match (2000: Slumberland)

You know what I do with this album?  I probably shouldn’t say this, but I only listen to the Amy Linton songs.  No offense to Wyatt Cusak (he sings 3 of the 14 songs on the album), but I’m a sucker for that girl group sound augmented with a big wall of guitars and that is what Linton specializes in.  The Aislers Set are kind of the Rosetta Stone of Slumberland, the linchpin of the label that links the seminal Black Tambourine to the current crop of bands like Lichtenstein, Brilliant Colors, Grass Widow, and Frankie Rose.  If there was a song that came out in the year 2000 that is better than the lead off track The Way To Market Station, I have yet to hear it.

mp3: Aislers Set -The Way To Market Station

mp3: Aislers Set – Hit the Snow

Animals That SwimHappiness From a Distant Star (2001: Snowstorm)

Admittedly Happiness from a Distant Star is not the best Animals that Swim album, that honor would got to I was the King, I Really Was the King, but Animals that Swim are so good that their third best album (they only made three) is better than anything someone like Sufijan Stevens could ever, ever come up with in his wildest dreams.  Singer Hank Stars is like the UK version of Silver Jews’ Dave Berman.  He paints vivid pictures of the down on their luck and downtrodden characters and does it with such an eye for melody and melancholy that you find yourself swept up in stories about Uncle Mackie, aliens and letter writing.

mp3: Animals That Swim- Mackie’s Wake

mp3: Animals That Swim -The Moon and the Mothership

The American Analog Set Know By Heart (2001: Tigersyle)

Up until Know By Heart, American Analog Set were background music to me, but with this record they seemed to grow some teeth and develop a pulse.  It’s still mellow, but there is a welcome tension to their songs.  The band create a hypnotic swirling sound that is so crisp and clean you could eat off of it.  Although the playing is at the forefront (the drumming is lovely), front guy Andrew Kenny comes to bat with some really strong pop songs.  The Postman is pretty unforgettable and Aaron & Maria is the poppiest thing that AmAnSet have ever laid to tape.

mp3: American Analog Set – Aaron and Maria

mp3: American Analog Set – The Postman

The TydeOnce (2001: Orange Sky)

Back in 2001 I wrote that the Tyde answer the question: What if Felt were from Southern California?  Darren Rademaker is an obvious fan that Birmingham, UK band, but you can also tell he knows his local history, showing an appreciation of the Byrds and Buffalo Springfield.  When this record came out in 2001 I was living down in San Diego, the perfect place to hear it.  Once was meant for the beach, surfing, getting good and high and eating at Swami’s Natural Food Cafe on a sunny Encinitas day.

mp3: The Tyde -All My Bastard Children

mp3: The Tyde – North County Times

Cornelius Point (2002: Matador)

Japanese pop alchemist Cornelius is a master of precision and layering on texture after texture onto the frame of a pop song.  A song might start with a water drop, become a trickling stream and end up a waterfall.  Each part taken by itself seems so basic and simple, but as they layer upon one another the complexity in it all becomes apparent.  Cornelius has this uncanny ability to create these engineering marvels and still make them sound vibrant, catchy and exiting.  If you ever have the chance to see him live jump at it, you will not regret it.  A true master builder at work.

mp3: Cornelius -Drop

mp3: Cornelius – Fly

Radio Dept. Lesser Matters (2003: Shelflife/Labrador)

Lesser Matters has not lost a spec of goodness since I first heard it back in 2003.  I never get tired of Johan Duncanson’s sleepy singing over top of  the band’s over-modulated drums and feedback tinged guitars. I hesitate to call it Swedish shoegaze, but they do seem to worship at the alter of the Mary Chain, albeit with synthesizers and cheap drum machines.  Later on in the decade Sophia Copula would put their music into movies and they would become somewhat more well known, but the band still seem to be a secret.

mp3: Radio Dept. -Where Damage Isn’t Already Done

mp3: Radio Dept. – 1995

A Frames2 (2003: S-S Records)

Any one of the A-Frames records could be on this list. The Seattle goth-punks birthed three albums in the early aughts and every single one of them was worthy.   Their paranoid, doom-laden, angular take on punk rock comes off as it was made in A Brave New World.  Everything is sterile, there is no emotion, and the skies are gray with nuclear fall-0ut.  Their second album, intuitively titled 2 has just enough pop juxtaposed with dread to make it a winner.  The band would go on to sign with Sub Pop for their third album, before drummer Lars Finberg would leave to concentrate on his other band the Intelligence.  The A Frames are what so-Cal punks DI would have been if they lived in the Pacific Northwest deprived of sun, surf and girls.  Feel the angst!

mp3: A Frames -Ionic

mp3: A Frames – Modula

Graham CoxonHappiness in Magazines (2004: EMI)

Blur. Bleh. Blah. Kind of sums up my opinion of Blur as their career progressed.  I just kind of lost interest.  Blur guitarist Graham Coxon always seemed  like he was the conflicted member of the group, not really embracing their super-stardom, keeping his foot in the lo-fi with his solo albums.  After he left the band, his records moved away from the feedback drenched jams to became a lot more structured and pop focused and Happiness in Magazines is easily his best record.  He drafted Blur producer Stephen Street to twiddle the knobs and he showed up with his grade A songs.  There’s the straightforward pop of Spectacular and Freakin Out, but he delves into the blues on Girl Done Gone and is downright funny on Bottom Bunk. I think with Happiness In Magazines Coxon reaches a level of comfortable with who he is and it shows.

mp3: Graham Coxon – Bottom Bunk

mp3: Graham Coxon – Spectacular

Katerine Robots Après Tout (2005: Rosebud/Barclay)

When this came out, I called it a freak-show in a jewel case.  I stand by those words, but I mean them in the best possible way.  Just by glancing at the cover you might get the idea that this is not your normal album.  Yeah, Katerine is French, so maybe it was cool to walk around in pink silk turtlenecks and women’s underwear back in 2005 somewhere in France, but I kind of doubt it.  Philippe Katerine’s records seemed to be getting stranger and stranger and this is the wacked out amazing culmination.  I think I like the really over the top songs the best.  The club-y strangeness of Borderline, the disco of 100% VIP and the funky Cornelius-like Qu’Est-Ce Qu’Il A Dit ? No matter what shade of strangeness you gravitate to, you will undoubtedly find it on this record and probably end up dancing to it.

mp3: Katerine -Borderline

mp3: Katerine – Le Train De 19h

Rough BunniesRough Bunnies Saved My Life (2005: Self-released)

Frida and Anna are the Rough Bunnies.  They’ve also been The Flame and Inside Riot, but Rough Bunnies is their favorite band.  They’re kind of Riot Grrl, they’re kind of Moldy Peaches, but mostly they’re Swedish punks releasing cd-r’s.  The songs are immediate and the Bunnies greatest concern seems to be to get it on tape before they forget it.  So everything has a ramshackle, but endearing feel to it.  The Bunnies are prolific as they are obscure, popping out CD-r’s like, umm rabbits.  They nearly signed to Alan McGee’s Poptones and Fine Arts Showcase did an entire album of Rough Bunnies covers.  Where do you start?  Rough Bunnies Saved My Life might be their best album, and if you like it there’s a treasure trove waiting for you.

mp3: Rough Bunnies -Rough Bunnies Saved My Life

mp3: Rough Bunnies – Dance With Your Shadow

Human TelevisionLook At Who You’re Talking To (2005: Gigantic Music)

Ahh, the jangling 80’s.  You know the saying, they don’t make ’em like they use to.  Human Television take it to heart and conjure the ghosts of the Rain Parade, Dumptruck, the Feelies and Let’s Active.  They write melancholy sounding songs punctuated by bright chiming and jangling guitars.  It’s a tried and true juxtaposition, and Human Television do it so well that they are excused for not bringing something new to the table.  Each and every one of these songs will make you shake your head in wonder at how good it is.  How good?  To paraphrase the album: sunshine on your face, room spinning round your head good.

mp3: Human Television -People Talking

mp3: Human Television – Tonight’s the Night

The Go-BetweensOceans Apart (2005: Yep Roc)

2000 marked the release of the first Go-Between album in 12 years, Friends of Rachel Worth, and 2005 marked the release of this, the final Go-Betweens album because of Grant McClennan’s sudden death in 2006. On Oceans Apart, McClennan was ever-present with his classic wistful pop songs as always. He always seemed to be able to reel off perfect pop without even trying and Boundary Rider and Finding You are among his best. But, on Oceans Apart it was Robert Forster that put this record on the map as my favorite Go-Betweens album. His frantic opener Here Comes a City, historical reminiscing rampage of Darlinghurst Nights and beautiful Lavender put this Go-Betweens album in the hallowed company of 16 Lovers Lane.

mp3: Go-Betweens -Darlinghust Nights

mp3: Go-Betweens -Boundary Rider

Tom VekWe Have Sound (2005: Go-Beat)

I can’t help but think that if this album was released two or three years later it would have been much bigger. Of course I’m usually wrong about things like this, but singles like Nothing But Green Lights and A Little Word In Your Ear mine similar veins as what James Murphy gets called a genius for.  Vek was in his early 20’s when he made We Have Sound, writing and playing everything.  It was such a stellar debut, and the future looked so bright the guy was wearing shades.  That was 2005, oh Tom where have you disappeared to?

mp3: Tom Vek -Nothing But Green Lights

mp3: Tom Vek – If You Want

BlumfeldVerbotene Fruchte (2006: Sony/BMG)

The number one album of 2006, well at least here at the Finest Kiss.  Obviously the band were nonplussed about the dubious honor,  deciding to break up in early 2007.  Verboten Fruchte is probably the German band’s most fleshed out record with lots of keyboards and even strings and horns.  Like Love circa Forever Changes they’ve thrown off their garage rock roots and blossomed into a more nuanced and textured way of doing things.  All of that fancy stuff can’t mask the garage rock origins of the band, it just shows their restlessness, and wanting to stretching out and trying new things.  If you’re like me, this record will have you reaching for your German-English dictionary, so you know what exactly you’re singing along to.

mp3: Blumfeld – Strobohobo

mp3: Blumfeld – Heiß Die Segel

Kelley Stoltz Below the Branches (2006: Sub Pop)

There is one group of people who I know loves this record. Advertisers and marketing dickies have latched onto Below the Branches and won’t let go. You can’t turn on the TV these days without hearing a song from it. Kelley Stoltz can sell other people’s products with his music, but has trouble selling his own records. Below the Branches is chock full of classic pop, one listen and you’ll want to start a marketing company.

mp3: Kelley Stoltz – Memory Collector

mp3: Kelley Stoltz – Birdies Singing

HollandThe Paris Hilton Mujahideen (2006: Teenbeat)

Almost coming off like a Guided By Voices record with short songs that are so catchy you can’t believe he only made them a minute and a half long.  Shards of guitar crash down on echo-y bass and keyboards as one man band Trevor Kampman croons with an icy disconnectedness.  The production is so clear, yet the songs are so  jarring and choppy that they literally reach out and grab and shake you.  Kampan is jaded, and down about the state of the world.  Paris Hilton Mujahideen is good illustration of the world back in 2006. Not much has changed.

mp3: hollAnd – Boolean Misery Index

mp3: hollAnd – Rapture Is Ready

BOAT Songs That You Might Not Like (2006: Magic Marker)

Seattle bands that love power pop and have a sense of humor, may sound like an oxymoron, but BOAT picked up the torch that was passed to them from a rich lineage that includes the Young Fresh Fellows, The President of the United States of America, Harvey Danger and even Mudhoney.  Songs That You Might Not Like wasted no time in firing salvo after salvo of funny, sad, heart-on-the-sleeve power pop.  How could you not like a bunch of guys that drink too much soda,  cruise in minivans, destroy noise rock bands, get called reptile boy, have ninjas sitting on their couch at home, and use skeleton keys?  This was their first record, and they would only get better.

mp3: BOAT – Remember the Romans

mp3: BOAT – Last Cans of Paint

Pants Yell!Alison Statton (2007: Soft Abuse)

At first I was perplexed by Pants Yell! naming their record after the Young Marble Giants singer and not sounding anything like them.  Then I thought, I named my blog after a Boo Radleys song and never write about that song or the band.  I won’t deny it, Pants Yell! are twee, but it’s twee with melancholy and attitude.  They actually sound equal parts Housemartins and Lucksmiths. Singer Andrew Churchman has an instantly memorable voice and this record equals any album from either of those two previously mentioned bands.  The only problem with Alison Statton is getting passed the first song More Purple, it’s so damn good you’ll find yourself  hitting rewind and never get to the rest of it.

mp3: Pants Yell! – More Purple

mp3: Pants Yell! – Alison Statton

Pelle Carlberg In a Nutshell (2007: Labrador)

Pelle Carlberg is a clever fellow. He’s got nothing but bad luck, a wonky wheel on his shopping cart, a crap career as a pop singer, and a broken clock. Carlberg got an ace up his sleeve though, his ability to make his mundane life seem so interesting.  He’s funny, self-deprecating, has a better command of English than most native speakers, and has a pocket full of pop songs that will make your ears prick up.  In a Nutshell was his second solo album after his band Edson broke up and it’s the one where he put all the pieces together to come up with something that people like Morrissey and Billy Bragg have long since stopped making.

mp3: Pelle Carlberg – Clever Girls Like Clever Boys Much More Than Clever Boys Like Clever Girls

mp3: Pelle Carlberg – I Love You, You Imbecile

ElectrelaneNo Shouts No Calls (2007: Too Pure)

One of the great disappointments of 2007 for me was Electrelane.  After making what I would argue is their best album they went and quit.  No Shouts No Calls was the Brighton, England band at their most melodic and immediate.  The production is raw with the drums nice and in your face, they way Albini made the Wedding Present sound on Seamonsters.  The songs contain elements of twee-pop and Kraut-rock combining to form melody driven grooves.  They can be gentle and understated like on Cut and Run or lay it all out on songs like Tram 21 and To The East.  I hold on to the hope that they really meant it when they said that they were going on indefinite hiatus, and not really actually quitting.

mp3: Electrelane – To the East

mp3: Electrelane – Saturday

IntelligenceDeuteronomy (2007: In the Red)

Up until Deuteronomy the Intelligence were decidedly lo-fi, but in 2007 the band’s mastermind Lars Finberg decided to turn up the bass and make a record that didn’t sound like the treble button was stuck at 11.  There are elements of darkness that his former band the A Frames excelled in, but the genius of Deuternomy is it’s skewed take on pop that he would later take to another level on this year’s Fake Surfers.   Intelligence records are like trip into the head of Finberg, and his world is a weird, wild, funny place place.  Weird like the Residents, wacked like Brainiac but catchy as Devo.

mp3: Intelligence – Moon Beeps

mp3: Intelligence – Secret Signals

Gentleman JesseGentleman Jesse (2008: Douchemaster)

Jesse Smith’s likely heros  include Nick Lowe, Paul Collins, Elvis Costello and Paul Weller.  These names certainly command respect, but the style of power pop that they are so well known for is decidedly out of style these days, and the likely reason that this album got no traction when it came out last year.  That’s the only reason I can think of because back in the old days when a record like this came out, it was blasting out of dorm rooms and cars everywhere.  Nowadays it’s all about headphone music and records that need to be heard blasting at full volume into the open air suffer.

mp3: Gentleman Jesse – Black Hole

mp3: Gentleman Jesse – The Rest of My Days

Alone Again Or

March 2, 2008 at 10:37 pm | Posted in mp3, Music, New Music | 4 Comments
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Robert Forster as the Evangelist
Go-Between, Robert Forster is back with his fifth solo album, though not by choice. He and Grant McLennan were working on the follow up to the Go-Between’s Oceans Apart when McLennan suddenly and shockingly died in his sleep. I still remember the last time I saw the Go-Betweens, they were touring for Ocean’s Apart and stopped in Seattle for a beautiful show at the Triple Door. They were both so alive with their band, Grant and Robert on guitar, Adele Pickvance on bass and Glenn Thompson on drums. They sounded so good. Mixing new songs with the old just made me buzz with anticipation of what these guys were still capable of next. It is so rare for a band that gets back together after breaking up ever getting close to past glories. Well I would argue that the Go-betweens met them and surpassed a lot of those old glories.

Thankfully Robert Forster has seen fit to carry on without his other half, because it sounded like he wasn’t sure he was going to carry on with music. His doubts were allayed when apparently the record just came together over the summer, it sounds like it was kind of a meant to be thing. It’s called The Evangelist and contains three song he wrote with the late McLennan. He also has his former Go-betweens Pickvance and Thompson back as his rhythm section and he’s even employed Mark Wallis and Dave Ruffy (who produced Oceans Apart), for production duties. The record itself is not a far cry from Oceans Apart. It starts out with some organ leading into a surfy guitar riff that makes you feel like you’re on the beach at sunset. I thought Forster wrote some of the best songs on Oceans Apart, he seemed to have hit a vein of gold in his writing. The new album shows he’s still mining that vein, even incorporating some country influence that was so prevalent on his his early solo albums. There are also some beautiful string arrangements courtesy of Audrey Riley as well as lovely female backing vocals evident in the haunting last song From Ghost Town. This is indeed a Robert Forster solo record and easily rivals Calling from a Country Phone (my favorite of his solo records), but the ghost of his songwriting partner emanates throughout it, in the lyrics, the guitar and just how when you hear a Forster song, you expect to hear a McLennan on right after. I for one am grateful that he decided to carry on without his friend and give us this ‘solo’ album.

mp3: Robert Forster – Pandanus (from The Evangelist)

buy: Robert Forster – Evangelist (pre-order, out 29 April)

A few more from Forster’s other solo albums:

mp3: Robert Forster – Dear Black Dream (from Danger in the Past)

mp3: Robert Forster – The Circle ( from Calling from a Country Phone)

mp3: Robert Forster – 2541 (from I Had a New York Girlfriend) a Grant Hart cover

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