Lake Ruth

July 17, 2016 at 9:08 pm | Posted in Albums, Music | Leave a comment
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lakeruth

If this were an outdoor blog you might be asking, where the heck is Lake Ruth? Since this is a music blog I don’t need to give you directions, hopefully you know where to find records on the internet. Hewson Chen of The New Lines, Matt Schulz of SavakHoly Fuck,  Enon along with vocalist Allison Brice from The Eighteenth Day of May opened up their resort earlier this year with a single that was like a cool drink perspiring on the arm of your Adirondack chair while you gazed at the ripples spreading out on the glassy lake.

If you are a fan of Chen’s New Lines, you will be likely be staying a while at Lake Ruth.They have expanded and updated the place with the luxurious long player Actual Entity. You get the sense that the place was built in the 60’s by a French architect who went to school in Berlin and studied Italian Renaissance. Also I think the place may have been used as the set for some long forgotten sci-fi television series, but I can’t be certain.  Grab a copy and see if you can figure it out.

Whyte Horses

July 10, 2016 at 8:59 pm | Posted in Albums, Music | 1 Comment
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whytehorses

Last December Did Not Chart wrote about Whyte Horses, the Manchester collective lead by Dom Thomas self-released their LP to much underground fanfare and quickly sold out of its 300 copies. It was such a tease, great album too bad they’re all gone. Fast forward to present day and sometimes patience instead of bidding on ebay pays off. The album Pop or Not has been reissued and is now in much wider circulation. How wide? I picked up a copy at my local record store here in Seattle.

Whyte Horses count as contributors to their wonderful 60’s psychedelic ecstasy Jez Williams of Doves, Jim Noir , Chris Geddes of Belle & Sebastian and  Ian Parton of The Go! Team. Some songs buzz like the Mary Chain or Stone Roses while others sound like Broadcast or Adventures in Stereo or Jacques Dutronc while some songs are spacey instrumentals influenced by Os Mutantes and Peter Thomas. The group seem to have an uncanny ability to merge a wide range of influences into a cohesive sound that continues to satisfy time after time. There are too many great ones here to single out only one or two and each time I listen to the record a new favorite emerges. Definitely one of this year’s (and last) best!

Kate Jackson Behind the Wheel Again

July 6, 2016 at 11:10 pm | Posted in Albums, Music, Records | Leave a comment
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katejackson
photo by David Emery

It’s been nearly eight years since Kate Jackson‘s former band Long Blondes broke up. After the breakup she started working on a new album with former Suede guitarist Bernard Butler. Kate then went off to Rome to focus on painting, leaving the Butler collaboration in a vault or on a hard drive collecting dust. At some point, encouraged by her pals she realized that she should finish the album that she had started with Butler.

It’s hard to believe that she’s been hiding these songs away for so long. Most artists would want to share songs as amazing and immediate as Metropolis, Stranded, Wonder Feeling and 16 Years. Some of them have elements of the hard crushing Long Blondes, while other are have a glamorous and cinematic feel to them. You can certainly hear Butler’s deft touches on many songs (especially love his guitar solo on 16 years).

Kate is self-releasing British Road Movies on her record label Hoo Ha Records (nice Scent of a Woman reference). It seems to have received a fair amount of press in the UK, but I haven’t heard many folks over here in the US talking about it. They should because it’s as good as anything she’s done prior.

An Interview With Math & Physics Club

June 26, 2016 at 8:30 pm | Posted in Music, Seattle, indiepop | Leave a comment
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Math & Physics Club

Scotland has Belle & Sebastian, Australia has the Lucksmiths and the Pacific Northwest has Math & Physics Club. The Puget Sound darlings share a common aesthetic with the former and a record label with the latter. While they never got out and toured the world to the extent of their colleagues, they’ve been releasing quality records for more than a decade. The Olympia by way of Seattle band (or vice versa) began as a trio, expanded to a quintet and then shrunk back down to a trio and now appear to have settled on being a quartet all the while releasing superbly crafted beautifully melancholy records. The band have just released a compilation that collects their first three EPs and some sundry B-sides. For those of us familiar with the band it’s a great reminder of how good those early songs were and for those not yet acquainted it serves as a great introductory and overview of one of indiepop’s well kept secrets.

Having lived in the PNW for about as long as Math & Physics Club has been around I feel like their records have been like soundtrack to my life up here. I’ve also had the pleasure of seeing them play live many times. After their recent in-store performance at Sonic Boom Records in Ballard I asked them if they wouldn’t mind answering a few questions for this blog. They kindly agreed. I hope you enjoy their insightful answers to my pedestrian questions, and if you happen to be in Seattle this summer the band will play a rare show at the Vera Project on August 8th. Also, be sure to pick up the new compilation In This Together from Matinée Recordings and Fika Recordings.

Do you recognize the Seattle of today compared to the one of 2005 when you released your first EP Weekends Away?

Ethan: It’s different, but we’re different too.  You can definitely follow the threads from the past into the present, but I guess recently it’s gotten to be a heavier weave.

Charles: I recently visited Bellingham where I went to college, and I couldn’t remember the last time I was there. It was familiar in that I could still find my way around, and a few of the old shops were still there, but a lot was new and I felt out of place even though I’d lived there for 6 years of my life. Seattle is a bit like that for me now. We’ve taken a lot of time between albums and shows in recent years, and each time we come up for air it feels like I barely recognize the musical landscape.

What has it been like being a band that could be described as twee in a city known for lumberjacks and grunge? Who were some of the bands that you identified with back then?

Ethan: Well, we liked the Posies, the Dharma Bums, Beat Happening, Young Fresh Fellows, Lois, Tullycraft, the Fastbacks, and in a way I think we’ve always seen ourselves as an extension of that part of the local scene, rather than the grunge scene. More Popllama or K than Subpop, if that means anything.  Although I guess we don’t sound like any of those bands, they’re part of our culture.

James:  I’m really thankful we got the chance to see all those bands growing up.  I think we probably learned a lot about the aesthetics of being in a band from watching people like Calvin Johnson or Jeremy Wilson from the Dharma Bums.  There wasn’t much separation between the audience and the musicians.  There was very few rock star personalities.  One minute you’d be standing next to someone watching the show and the next minute they’d be up on stage playing.

Charles: I love how James described it there. I think more than anything we were exposed to bands that respected each other and their audience, and that’s what rubbed off in how we’ve approached being in a band.

Do you think that sounding so different from the what people expected a band from Seattle (or Olympia) to sound like helped you to get recognized in the beginning?

Ethan: I’m not sure if it helped or hurt.  We like a lot of the same bands other people like, and that comes out in the music.

Charles:  I think it’s fair to say it helped us in the beginning. We probably didn’t sound like a lot of the other demos that landed on desks at KEXP, for example. Sometimes getting people’s attention is half the battle.

The story is that you sent a demo tape to Jimmy at Matinee and quickly became the first American band on the label. What songs were on the demo and why do you think you’re the only band on that American record label? Do you have to speak with an accent when you talk to your label?

Ethan: Our first EP is basically identical to the demo, except we included Love Again on the EP instead of Nothing Really Happened.  The demo version of Nothing Really Happened is on the new compilation.  I think the story is, Mark Monnone from the Lucksmiths was staying with Jimmy when our demo arrived in the mail, and Mark talked him into giving us a chance.

James:  I think that actually is a true story.  We should ask Mark and Jimmy to tell us what happened that fabled night.  Right when we were joining Matinee another American band called the Fairways was sort of calling it a day.  I always loved their music and wished we’d had the chance to get to know them and play a few shows together.

Charles: I think some of that is Mark’s cheeky version of the story, but no doubt he was there when Jimmy got the demo. Whatever the real story, it couldn’t have worked out more perfectly for us. As for why we’re still the only American band on the label, you’d have to ask Jimmy, but if you look around the States there really aren’t a lot of bands doing a similar style of pop, which fits pretty neatly into Matinee’s aesthetic.

How were the first two EPs recorded, were they done by yourselves or did you go into a studio for them?

Ethan: They were mostly recorded at Silvermaple Studio, which is what we called James’ basement, and it consisted of an old computer with CoolEdit, a Mackie PA for preamps and reverb, and a couple of SM57s. The drums for the second EP were recorded in a friend’s basement because he could record more than two mics at a time! Some bits were recorded at Charles’ house, too.  We mixed the first EP ourselves, and I think we mixed the second EP too, but our mix was so bad that the mastering engineer told us to redo it.  Kevin had all the files on his laptop, but he was leaving for several weeks, so he remixed the whole EP from scratch in a day or two!  I actually really like the sound of the early EPs.

James:  There really is nothing more terrifying than having Barry Corliss listen to your mix and then point to the door and say come back for mastering when you have it fixed.  We really had no idea what we were doing when it came to writing and recording music which was part of the fun.  Not knowing how to do something meant there weren’t really any rules.

Charles: Though not following any rules also meant you got sent home to redo it by Barry! My favorite bit of nostalgia about recording those early EPs is that Kevin played the bass drum on Sixteen and Pretty with a spoon because he’d forgotten some piece of drum equipment that day. In all honesty, I used to feel sheepish about the lo-fi sound on the early recordings, but after having worked in a bunch of studios since then, I appreciate that we were somehow able to capture a feeling that’s not easy to replicate.

MAPC was originally five members, but Kevin Emerson (though Kevin still plays drums in the band) and Saundrah Humphrey left after the first album. Besides the obvious we’re now a three piece, how did the band change when they left?

Ethan: Mostly it streamlined our decision making. We’ve always made all our decisions together, so now there are only three people in all the email threads.  Usually we figure out the details, and then see if Kevin’s available.  And he almost always is. We’ve been playing together for so long, Kevin just knows what to play almost automatically.  Before we went into the studio to record California, I think we only rehearsed twice!

James:  I’m not entirely sure Kevin isn’t back to being a full time member of MAPC these days.  We should ask him sometime!

Charles: At the time Kevin left, I don’t think we quite realized how much the band is really defined by the four of us. We’ve played with other drummers who are our friends and fine musicians, but there’s something about the four of us together that just feels like magic, if you’ll pardon the metaphysics. Luckily we’ve found a way to keep him close. And Saundrah was such a vital part of our early sound that we couldn’t help but change, and I think you can hear the difference in our sound after she left in 2007.

Not many bands stay together for ten plus years. How do you account for your longevity?

Ethan: Well, we’re friends.  Some people have poker nights, or they get together to watch football games or something, but we have the band.  And because we’re friends, we all know that family comes first, and so we just get together when we can.  It’s not always easy, but when we get together, everything just falls into place.  It sounds like us, and that’s really satisfying.

James:  So there’s laughing and then there’s can’t catch your breath sort of laughing.  I’ve probably laughed the hardest over the last ten years hanging out doing stuff with this band.  We have a ton of fun when we get together and the music just flows easily for some magical reason.

Charles: I love you guys.

More bands should play in museums. I recently saw the Intelligence play the Frye and it reminded me of seeing you play SAM. I think you even covered  the Stone Roses & Razorcuts at that performance. What were some of your more memorable shows in Seattle and elsewhere?

Ethan: We actually got to play our Razorcuts cover with Gregory Webster once!  He sang A Is for Alphabet with us at San Francisco Popfest, but sadly the only evidence is a photograph of the top of Gregory’s head!

James:  Museums, libraries, record stores, etc. are absolutely some of the coolest places we’ve had a chance to play.  Our show at the Seattle Art Museum is probably one of my all time favorite live experiences along with the time we played at the same local public library Charles and I used to go to in Olympia when we were kids.

Charles: I love playing in alternative venues. I wish Seattle had more affordable makeshift music spaces. I’m still hoping to find a boat we can play on! Playing at Bumbershoot in the Sky Church in 2005 is one of my favorites. I couldn’t believe how packed it was, and we were playing on this huge stage and it was weird and wonderful.

I know Charles has been playing in Unlikely Friends with Dave from BOAT, but you included a brand new song (Coastal California, 1985) on the new compilation. So what does the future have in store for MAPC?

Ethan: We recorded another song at the same time as Coastal California, and we’re holding onto that for the future. We have a plan to record some new demos.  We’re working up plans for a little tour in the Autumn but I think that’s still a secret.  Also, Kevin and I have a side project called Northern Allies, which is more of a new wave postpunk sort of band.  But Math and Physics Club seems to turn up opportunities for fun and adventure, which is all anyone can ask for, and it manages to stay alive somehow.  I’m so thankful it does.

James:  We don’t really have a roadmap drawn for MAPC.  We’re just sort of letting it evolve organically and we’ll see where that takes us next.

Charles: Nothing so far has gone according to any plan we could have dreamed up. As long as it continues to be fun, we’ll keep doing it.

Savak

June 17, 2016 at 8:10 am | Posted in DC, Music, Punks, Seattle | Leave a comment
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savak

Taking after Gang of Four, Joy Division, Dead Kennedys and more recently Viet Cong, Savak stir up the pot right from the get go by naming themselves for the Iranian secret police under the Shah of Iran. They probably won’t be invited to play at Oberlin College in Ohio, but I doubt they care. Featuring members of Obits, Nation of Ulysses, the Cops, Holy Fuck, Edsel, et al, these punk rock veterans know what they’re doing and will not be dissuaded or deterred.

Former Obits guitarist and Edsel front guy Sohrab Habibion and former Cops front guy, Mt Fuji records proprietor and Seattleite Michael Jaworski share vocal duties throughout. Their styles mesh well and lend themselves well to the earnest and tempestuous songs. You can hear the old DC punk influence of the Dischord sect mixed in with some good old fashioned That Petrol Emotion acerbic energy on Alive In Shadows, Drop the Pieces, Call It a Night and Early Western Traders. Traders also features some great skronky saxophone that makes it an easy highlight of the record. Elsewhere you can hear some REM influence on Reaction and Burned by a Fever which should keep listeners with fainter hearts engaged.  Best of Luck In Future Endeavors is a solid record with something on it for old punks, new punks and punks in training.

You can stream and buy the download at Savak’s bandcamp page, or buy the vinyl and CD version from the record label Comedy Minus One.

Catch As Ondas

June 5, 2016 at 1:21 pm | Posted in Music, Surf | Leave a comment
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asondas

Take some Power Corruption & Lies New Order, Imperial f.f.r.r. Unrest and some current day Orca Team and Shopping and you could have a fairly good idea where the debut album from As Ondas is coming from. Andrew Milk from Shopping lends his bass this trio and is joined by Ochi Reyes of Wachi Wachi  and Moema Meade of Joey Fourr.

The band sing in English, Portuguese and Spanish. and their slightly dancy, very minimalist and laid back sound has an effortless feel to it. The first track Iguale has New Order style guitar, but New Order never sang in Portuguese or Spanish, though they did like to hang out on Ibiza. The entire record has a playful and easy feel to it centered around tight rhythmic songs. Esta Noche is guaranteed to make you move something on your body and Vida de um Creep has an intro that sounds like the Smithereens‘ Blood and Roses and then morphs into a Funboy Three song. Looking for something cool and fun for the summer? This is it!

As Ondas is available on CD & download via Jigsaw Records in the US and on vinyl via Tuff Enuff in the UK.



Barbaric City Yelps

May 28, 2016 at 7:11 pm | Posted in Music, Punks, Vinyl | Leave a comment
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cityyelps

City Yelps a three piece band from Leeds have just released an album called Half Hour. It’s rough around the edges, but like all good punk records its white hot delivery overshadows sound quality. In fact, the band seem to revel in their lo-fi. The liner notes state “City Yelps think they’re these DIY puritans but let me tell you now, you are being conned if you buy this record because they’re just lazy bums and nothing more.” 

It’s noisy and rambunctious like Swell Maps and the Beatnick Filmstars, but has a literacy and outsider style that reminds me of Animals that Swim. They make the mundane sound interesting like on We Like the Hours which is about a girl who works nights in a bakery, and 11.99 about going to a theatre and having to sit down to watch a band. Another highlight, Music for Adverts takes some shots at bands that make advert ready music…”making people wish they were dead.” You can hear the spite and spit into the microphone. City Yelps’ Half Hour is the real shit with no polish!

Downloads and vinyl are available from the Odd Box bandcamp.

Tomorrow the World!

May 22, 2016 at 7:47 pm | Posted in Music, Singles | Leave a comment
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the world
photo by mike rosati

If you are familiar with Andy Human who’s records are an Ohio elixir of Devo and Pere Ubu and and Pang who’s two 7″ singles pulled in influences like Kleenex and Long Blondes then you probably have a pretty good idea of what the World sound like. To get a better idea , throw in a couple of saxophones into that thought. Now put on the debut single by the Bay area band, close your eyes and you are quickly transported back to the late 1970’s into the world of the Specials, Clash and X-Ray Specs. Your legs begin to twitch and suddenly you’re skanking across the floor to this four song single. Killer!

The single is out on Upset the Rhythm. Watch out for the band’s upcoming US tour and their green flexi too.

P R O – L I T H I C S

May 18, 2016 at 8:54 pm | Posted in Music, Portland, Post-punk | Leave a comment
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Lithics

Portland, Oregon post punkers Lithics have just released a scorcher of a debut album. Fans of Pylon, Gang of Four and the Au Pairs should take note of this record. Borrowed Floors is chock full of rolling bass, jagged guitars and androgynous vocals. The songs sound like they’ve pulled in from the wild hinterlands of the Rose city. It appears as though someone tried to domesticate them, but failed. Careful entering the cage, this one will pin you down and make you buy a copy.

Downloads available from bandcamp and vinyl at Water Wing Records.




The Bin Bags in the Church for Psychopaths

May 12, 2016 at 7:22 pm | Posted in Music, Psychedlia | Leave a comment
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binbags

The Bin Bags self-titled album is everything I had hoped DRINKS (the Cate Le Bon  & Tim Presley collaboration) would be. The Bin Bags are from London and count Rose Keeler of Keel Her as a member.Their brand of hazy and playful psychedelia strikes a fine balance between pop and weird. It’s got bits of the Syd Barrett, Acetone and Ultimate Painting in it. Their confident and steady hand doesn’t seem to be trying to impress you with how weird they can be, rather they sound more like they’re trying to hide their weirdness.

The Bin Bags self-titled album is out on Permanent Slump.

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